Lost stately homes

Bunkers, shelters and other buildings
User avatar
cnosni
Site Admin
Posts: 4199
Joined: Wed 28 Mar, 2007 4:47 pm

Postby cnosni » Thu 04 Jun, 2009 10:09 pm

Brandy wrote: Thanks dave and blackprinceIve put a pic of the area as is now from google earth along with a map of the area from 1854 and by my reckoning i wasnt far off with the location being on the site of the B&Q.Infact its more closer to the site of the carpet shop.I might try and track down some of the work of george walker,it should be interesting!according to what ive found out so far the area that is now occupied by the offices at the side of the complex used to be a large lake that was formed by damning the stream that flows into the small pond that is there to this day!fascinating eh?ps/excellent site you have put together matt by the way As usual you rae a whizz Brandy.But, i think that the house was actually in Asda car park.If you look the road to York in 1854 obviously follows the present route.But this "road" is nothing like the width of today.If you look at Brandys pics there is a topographical feature that appears in both the photo and the 1854 map.Ive tried to blow up Brandys comparison pic,and have marked the freature in red (stream?).In both halves of the comparison it moves in a north westerley direction (from the bottom centre)In 1854 it continues under the road but comes to an abrupt when it meets the road in modern times.It would appear that the location of the lake/pond is where the feature was on the north side of the road in 1854.If this was indeed a stream then was this small lake/pond created as a result of necessary work during the widening of York Road?Now as the road is now wider then it would look possible that the widening has occured on the north side of the road,in other words closer to Killingbeck Hall.With this in mind,using the south side of the current A64 as the road in 1854 then this would shift the percieved position of the hall further south,from the B&Q to Asda car park?What do you think?    
Don't get me started!!My Flickr photos-http://www.flickr.com/photos/cnosni/Secret Leeds contactinfo@secretleeds.com
User avatar
cnosni
Site Admin
Posts: 4199
Joined: Wed 28 Mar, 2007 4:47 pm

Postby cnosni » Thu 04 Jun, 2009 10:11 pm

Damn
Attachments
__TFMF_2levq1ugw2iydg55a21lwen5_da7088ae-7438-48d6-8051-65ba5d0d5148_0_main.jpg
__TFMF_2levq1ugw2iydg55a21lwen5_da7088ae-7438-48d6-8051-65ba5d0d5148_0_main.jpg (57.52 KiB) Viewed 2951 times
Don't get me started!!My Flickr photos-http://www.flickr.com/photos/cnosni/Secret Leeds contactinfo@secretleeds.com
User avatar
blackprince
Posts: 708
Joined: Tue 04 Sep, 2007 2:10 pm

Postby blackprince » Thu 04 Jun, 2009 10:12 pm

LostHeritage wrote: blackprince wrote: bigpants wrote: blackprince - really good link you posted there. it lists kippax park which i was going to mention, i think it was in the field next to ours but i need to check. i remember seeing the pics before of it, such a shame as it was what i would call a "proper" stately home. Glad you liked the link.I notice that quite a few of the houses mentioned in this thread are not on this list. I suppose what constitutes a stately home is a bit subjective. Does it have to be of architectural interest, historical interest and have large estates to qualify? Its a pity more of the lost houses listed don't have photos. HiThis is a fascinating thread and I appreciate your interest in my Lost Heritage website.BlackPrince: you are correct in that many houses would rightly be considered large houses aren't on my list as I have tried to focus on those which were 'country estates' rather than the larger suburban villas - unfortunately there are just too many.The lost country houses of Yorkshire has been comprehensively covered in a series of books by Edward Waterson and others which, although out of print, are usually available second hand via Amazon or eBay or abebooks. There are also several Yorkshire houses in Giles Worsley's 'England's Lost Houses'.I have many books on this topic, so if you would like information on a specific house please just say either here or email me on contact@lostheritage.org.uk and I'll see what I can find and either post it here or on my website. I do also have access to many photos of these houses which I can't post on the website for copyright reasons but would be happy to scan and email you privately. I would also be grateful for any information anyone can contribute to expand or fill in the gaps on my list. Kind regards Matt Yes, excellent website Matt. I've bookmarked it for future reference . So far I've only looked at Yorkshire houses.
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
Bosshooch
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon 15 Jun, 2009 10:16 pm

Postby Bosshooch » Tue 16 Jun, 2009 4:08 am

Brandy wrote: Killingbeck hall is one im trying to research myself this here is from leodis-13th January 1949. ront view of Killingbeck Hall, a large stone building, built in the 18th Century by the Brooke Family. A well maintained lawn is in front of the house. A grassy area with wooden benches is in the foreground surrounded by a path. Outbuildings can be seen to the right. A lot of people get Killingbeck hall mixed up with the nurses living quarters behind the hospital.From the research i have done killingbeck hall stood somewhere around the site of the B&Q. There doesent seem to be much on the web about the hall so if anybody else has any info for me i would be highly delighted The Photo is of the old Nurses home. I've worked at Gipton Fire Station since 1979 and attended to Fire alarm calls there quite often. The building didn't get demolished until after 1983. If you do a search for "Killingbeck Hall" and "Maps" you should find some from 1851 onwards. The original Killingbeck Hall was where the doctors residences used to be roughly at the opposite end of the block where B&Q is (I think its a carpet shop) and about 30 yds behind. There are some maps of the 1930's which show the hospital, and that building was just to the Right and below of the right hand "H" of the wards. I've got some old press clipping from the YEP some where about Killingbeck Hall. If I can find them I will scan them and attach.Have a look athttp://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?resourceIde ... AY=FULLThe Hall is 1" from top right approx (the dark building). The original would have been off the photo to bottom left.

Bosshooch
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon 15 Jun, 2009 10:16 pm

Postby Bosshooch » Tue 16 Jun, 2009 4:36 am

cnosni wrote: Damn Re the Lake and Stream. The pond has always been there, not much bigger than it is now. The Stream, known as Wyke Beck actually flows from top left to bottom left following Wykebeck Valley Road (about 1cm to the right of the road on the Google Map) where the wavy hedges are. I've paddled in it many a time as a youngster. It disappears under York Road and comes out again at the other side of the railway line (just out of shot bottom left). It continues to the sewerage works at Knostrop then from there into the River Aire. The Beck is a lot lower than the pond and couldn't possibly feed into it. As Killingbeck Hospital was at the top of a hill compared with the surrounding area, I can only suppose it is fed by means of a spring. The are some 154 photos of Wyke beck on the Leodis/net site. (Doesn't have much to do with Killingbeck Hall but I thought I'd add a bit to the conversation).Hoo
User avatar
chameleon
Site Admin
Posts: 5462
Joined: Thu 29 Mar, 2007 6:16 pm

Postby chameleon » Tue 16 Jun, 2009 8:41 pm

cnosni wrote: Brandy wrote: Thanks dave and blackprinceIve put a pic of the area as is now from google earth along with a map of the area from 1854 and by my reckoning i wasnt far off with the location being on the site of the B&Q.Infact its more closer to the site of the carpet shop.I might try and track down some of the work of george walker,it should be interesting!according to what ive found out so far the area that is now occupied by the offices at the side of the complex used to be a large lake that was formed by damning the stream that flows into the small pond that is there to this day!fascinating eh?ps/excellent site you have put together matt by the way As usual you rae a whizz Brandy.But, i think that the house was actually in Asda car park.If you look the road to York in 1854 obviously follows the present route.But this "road" is nothing like the width of today.If you look at Brandys pics there is a topographical feature that appears in both the photo and the 1854 map.Ive tried to blow up Brandys comparison pic,and have marked the freature in red (stream?).In both halves of the comparison it moves in a north westerley direction (from the bottom centre)In 1854 it continues under the road but comes to an abrupt when it meets the road in modern times.It would appear that the location of the lake/pond is where the feature was on the north side of the road in 1854.If this was indeed a stream then was this small lake/pond created as a result of necessary work during the widening of York Road?Now as the road is now wider then it would look possible that the widening has occured on the north side of the road,in other words closer to Killingbeck Hall.With this in mind,using the south side of the current A64 as the road in 1854 then this would shift the percieved position of the hall further south,from the B&Q to Asda car park?What do you think?     Chris, Brandy - do you have the 1908 Godfrey map? This shows The Hall to be some 300m north of the York Road - I think I'd put the Hall somewhere between Carpet Right and B&Q/their car parks.At that point, the road follows more or less its original line, I can go back almost 60 years (but not quite!), and lived nearby, and recall very clearly that the stone wall between road and field was 'elderly' looking then, indeed one or two noticable features still remain, suggesting it might not have been moved for road widening.There was a small stream which seemed to run from what I think was a spring close to the old Killingbeck Lodge (the land started to fall away to the west there, and the land would be boggy further towards Wyke Beck. The actual presence of water was irregular. The track running at the side of the office complex opposite where you've marked is still there and was the track to Killingbeck Farm. That is also close to the valley bottom so any run-off could have gone west or south west from thereYork Road was realigned at least once to remove the bend as it approached Selby Road, before that, it ran very close to the railway embankment through what is now Highways/Diadem Drive/Killingbeck Bridge (you can see the old line on Live Search Maps).This realignment straightened the road, moving its line NW leaving then to run over roughly the mid-point of the original Killingbeck Pond which was in-filled. The present pond is man-made as Brandy is aware, and some distance east of the original.It does look as though this had been fed primarily by Wyke Beck with at least two out-flows passing under the railway embankment. One of these is the continuation of Wyke Beck as we see it today - the point at which the worst flooding occurs - the other is shown to be controlled by sluices running to works on the southern side of the railway. I don't remember what they were but I think Cardiarms or Grumpytramp has mentioned this elsewhere.A sewage works was sited just to the east of the Wyke Beck on this side of the railway too, showing a very small pond/pool with what seems to be a stream running SE parallel to the beck - there is nothing to show a stream running from the field of The Hall to here or indeed any stream at all in front of The Hall.
arthor
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue 02 Dec, 2008 8:03 am

Postby arthor » Wed 17 Jun, 2009 6:55 pm

Greetings,The destruction of the old stately homes is quite sad really. Created quite a lot of unemployment as well.An earlier post mentions Edward Waterson. I have "Lost Houses of the West Riding" by him and Peter Meadows. It is one of a series that was published by Jill Raines (private publisher??) in 1998 seemingly with the aid of a grant from Carter Jonas, chartered surveyors. I have had it for several years and picked it up in Just Books, one of those cheapy book places (that is nowhere near 'just books').Will keep my eye open for the rest. I also have a copy of Pevenser for this area. No pics obviously but nice to dip into.wasshael
User avatar
chameleon
Site Admin
Posts: 5462
Joined: Thu 29 Mar, 2007 6:16 pm

Postby chameleon » Tue 21 Dec, 2010 8:20 pm

Maybe not quite the Stately Home but this local Grade 2 listed place is often mention on here -'Built in 1694 for John More, the hall is one of the best examples of 17th century domestic architecture in this area. It has been in the occupation of the present owners, the Chapman family, for the last 70 years. The hall is offered together with its small group of farm buildings (with planning consent for re-development into 4 houses) and in all about 3¾ acres of land. Austhorpe Hall in its current form was re-built in a classical style in 1694 by Mr John More and comprises a two-storey brick-built dwelling of seven bays under a hipped, pitched roof with stone slates, with a central one-bay pediment and with stone quoins to give it emphasis. The building represents a remarkable early example of a country dwelling in the classical style. The uncoursed stone remains of an earlier dwelling, including cellars and a ground floor structure, were retained and form part of the northern part of Austhorpe Hall.'And now a chance to make it yours for just 3K750!http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for ... miumA=true

User avatar
Leodian
Posts: 6127
Joined: Thu 10 Jun, 2010 8:03 am

Postby Leodian » Tue 21 Dec, 2010 8:48 pm

chameleon wrote: Maybe not quite the Stately Home but this local Grade 2 listed place is often mention on here -'Built in 1694 for John More, the hall is one of the best examples of 17th century domestic architecture in this area. It has been in the occupation of the present owners, the Chapman family, for the last 70 years. The hall is offered together with its small group of farm buildings (with planning consent for re-development into 4 houses) and in all about 3¾ acres of land. Austhorpe Hall in its current form was re-built in a classical style in 1694 by Mr John More and comprises a two-storey brick-built dwelling of seven bays under a hipped, pitched roof with stone slates, with a central one-bay pediment and with stone quoins to give it emphasis. The building represents a remarkable early example of a country dwelling in the classical style. The uncoursed stone remains of an earlier dwelling, including cellars and a ground floor structure, were retained and form part of the northern part of Austhorpe Hall.'And now a chance to make it yours for just 3K750!http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for ... miumA=true It looks a nice property for £725,00. Shame that I can't afford it. I wonder what the council tax is?
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
User avatar
chameleon
Site Admin
Posts: 5462
Joined: Thu 29 Mar, 2007 6:16 pm

Postby chameleon » Tue 21 Dec, 2010 9:04 pm

Leodian wrote: chameleon wrote: Maybe not quite the Stately Home but this local Grade 2 listed place is often mention on here -'Built in 1694 for John More, the hall is one of the best examples of 17th century domestic architecture in this area. It has been in the occupation of the present owners, the Chapman family, for the last 70 years. The hall is offered together with its small group of farm buildings (with planning consent for re-development into 4 houses) and in all about 3¾ acres of land. Austhorpe Hall in its current form was re-built in a classical style in 1694 by Mr John More and comprises a two-storey brick-built dwelling of seven bays under a hipped, pitched roof with stone slates, with a central one-bay pediment and with stone quoins to give it emphasis. The building represents a remarkable early example of a country dwelling in the classical style. The uncoursed stone remains of an earlier dwelling, including cellars and a ground floor structure, were retained and form part of the northern part of Austhorpe Hall.'And now a chance to make it yours for just 3K750!http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for ... miumA=true It looks a nice property for £725,00. Shame that I can't afford it. I wonder what the council tax is? Band G which in Leeds is £1872pa. The highest band is presently £2246.Mind if alterations increase the value, a property can be moved to an higher band when certain events take place such as change of ownership.





Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests