Lost stately homes

Bunkers, shelters and other buildings
User avatar
blackprince
Posts: 708
Joined: Tue 04 Sep, 2007 2:10 pm

Postby blackprince » Fri 29 May, 2009 7:07 pm

bigpants wrote: blackprince - really good link you posted there. it lists kippax park which i was going to mention, i think it was in the field next to ours but i need to check. i remember seeing the pics before of it, such a shame as it was what i would call a "proper" stately home. Glad you liked the link.I notice that quite a few of the houses mentioned in this thread are not on this list. I suppose what constitutes a stately home is a bit subjective. Does it have to be of architectural interest, historical interest and have large estates to qualify? Its a pity more of the lost houses listed don't have photos.
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
User avatar
blackprince
Posts: 708
Joined: Tue 04 Sep, 2007 2:10 pm

Postby blackprince » Tue 02 Jun, 2009 8:23 pm

I just checked the latest additions to Leodis and there are a whole load of photos of 2 old halls in Aberford.Parlington HallLotherton Hallhttp://www.leodis.net/searchResults.aspx?TYPE= ... CURRPAGE=1
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
Middleton Sheriff
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri 08 May, 2009 7:56 am

Postby Middleton Sheriff » Wed 03 Jun, 2009 12:16 pm

Anybody remember a lovely old house that stood off North Lane, Roundhay, it was called Mayo House and was demolished in the mid 1970s. It was just about where Mayo Close is now and used to have extensive gardens where the Elmetes now are built.
motleywill
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed 01 Oct, 2008 8:44 pm

Postby motleywill » Wed 03 Jun, 2009 1:00 pm

Thanks to Hector for this - I had not realised there were two Osmondthorpe Halls! Is there are any pictorial record of the one the Motleys lived in? It makes sense that they had more fashionable 18th C house - as they had made their money as wool merchants then. The Old Hall looks rather gloomy and uncomfortable and would not have been fashionable.The Motleys moved to Lanelli, S Wales c 1809 where they tried to set up a coal mine which did not succeed financially. The next generation went all round the world but some did return to Leeds and my grandfather Lewis Motley was born there I believe.(Incidentally I notice that on the list of lost Yorkshire houses is listed Thornes House in Wakefield where my grandmothers family (Milnes Gaskell) lived. They also had a house there called Lupsett - does anyone know of it? Sorry if this is straying from the Leeds area!) Hector wrote: To clarify the Motley's lived at Osmondthorpe Hall, which is where the YMVC used to exist. It burnt down in 1924. Osmondthorpe Old Hall was situated, on Osmondthorpe Lane near to the ginnel, this was demolished in the 1930s, if you look on Leodis, it is this building that photogtaphs exist for.Just to add in the 1880s, when there was a proposal to build a racecourse and cricket arena the site of Osmondthorpe Hall would have housed the cricket pavilion.The Motleys appear to have left the Hall by about 1809, it seems to have been built in the 1720s.    

Brandy
Posts: 1550
Joined: Wed 21 Feb, 2007 8:03 am

Postby Brandy » Wed 03 Jun, 2009 2:01 pm

Killingbeck hall is one im trying to research myself this here is from leodis-13th January 1949. ront view of Killingbeck Hall, a large stone building, built in the 18th Century by the Brooke Family. A well maintained lawn is in front of the house. A grassy area with wooden benches is in the foreground surrounded by a path. Outbuildings can be seen to the right. A lot of people get Killingbeck hall mixed up with the nurses living quarters behind the hospital.From the research i have done killingbeck hall stood somewhere around the site of the B&Q. There doesent seem to be much on the web about the hall so if anybody else has any info for me i would be highly delighted
Attachments
__TFMF_sbbps5554jh0xy55qrv1mt45_04bcdb82-6291-4d27-ae2d-30e690cd5755_0_main.jpg
__TFMF_sbbps5554jh0xy55qrv1mt45_04bcdb82-6291-4d27-ae2d-30e690cd5755_0_main.jpg (55.72 KiB) Viewed 2590 times
There are only 10 types of people in the world -those who understand binary, and those that don't.
electricaldave
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu 29 Nov, 2007 2:29 pm

Postby electricaldave » Wed 03 Jun, 2009 9:20 pm

Looking at the 1906 Godfrey map, there were quite a number of buildings next to it, and a fair bit of woodland.I do remember that there was quite a lot of cast iron rail fencing on partof the 'sanner' which seems to me to coincide with this map.It's not easy to unplait it all though because Killingbeck hospital was extended quite significantly, first with temporary structures which turned out to be not as temporary as intended - some remained almost right up to final site demolition.The extended part of the hospital definately edged on to the old Hall's territory, I seem to remember, probably falsely, that some of the outbuildings were used as housing - probably for senior staff.
User avatar
blackprince
Posts: 708
Joined: Tue 04 Sep, 2007 2:10 pm

Postby blackprince » Wed 03 Jun, 2009 11:49 pm

Brandy wrote: Killingbeck hall is one im trying to research myself this here is from leodis-13th January 1949. ront view of Killingbeck Hall, a large stone building, built in the 18th Century by the Brooke Family. A well maintained lawn is in front of the house. A grassy area with wooden benches is in the foreground surrounded by a path. Outbuildings can be seen to the right. A lot of people get Killingbeck hall mixed up with the nurses living quarters behind the hospital.From the research i have done killingbeck hall stood somewhere around the site of the B&Q. There doesent seem to be much on the web about the hall so if anybody else has any info for me i would be highly delighted Year Demolished 1978 & 2 more photoshttp://lh.matthewbeckett.com/houses/lh_yorkshire_killingbeckhall_info_gallery.html
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
User avatar
blackprince
Posts: 708
Joined: Tue 04 Sep, 2007 2:10 pm

Postby blackprince » Thu 04 Jun, 2009 12:27 am

Brandy wrote: Killingbeck hall is one im trying to research myself this here is from leodis-13th January 1949. ront view of Killingbeck Hall, a large stone building, built in the 18th Century by the Brooke Family. A well maintained lawn is in front of the house. A grassy area with wooden benches is in the foreground surrounded by a path. Outbuildings can be seen to the right. A lot of people get Killingbeck hall mixed up with the nurses living quarters behind the hospital.From the research i have done killingbeck hall stood somewhere around the site of the B&Q. There doesent seem to be much on the web about the hall so if anybody else has any info for me i would be highly delighted A bit more information gleaned from the wwwGeorge Walker was born at Killingbeck Hall, Seacroft, on 8th May 1781. His father, William Walker, was a successful businessman in Leeds. After being educated in York, Walker became an artist. At first he concentrated on local, rural landscapes. Walker developed a reputation as a good artist and in 1814 and a local bookseller commissioned a series of paintings for the book Costume of Yorkshire. The book contained forty pictures of local people including: The Horse Dealer, Cloth Makers, The Collier, The Cloth Dresser, Stone Breakers, The Milk Boy, Whalebone Scrapers, Wensley Dale Knitters, Leech Finders, Sheffield Cutler and Factory Children. The book also included the first ever painting of a locomotive. The picture was of Salamanca at Middleton Colliery that had been produced by John Blenkinsop and Matthew Murray. In 1824 George Walker travelled to Italy where he spent time in Naples, Rome and Florence. He also visited Switzerland and France. George Walker spent the rest of his life at Killingbeck Lodge, Seacroft. He died there in 1856. alsoTranscript of the entry of "professions and trades"for SEACROFT in Baines's Directory and Gazetteer Directory of 1822.Gentry &c.: Walker Geo. Esq. Killingbeck cottage Walker Thomas, Esq. magistrate, Killingbeck hall Wilson John, Esq. Seacroft house Thomas Walker, son of William Walker (1773-1830) of Killingbeck Hall, Leeds, and grandson of Samuel(1742-1792) and Sarah Walker (Nee Nutt) of Masborough, born 19th October, 1908, was a J.P. and Deputy Lieutenant for Yorkshire. He married 8th January, 1841 Anna daughter of John Stephenson Ferguson of Ballykinnon House, Country Antrim. At some stage he lived at The Woodlands, Rotherham, now Woodlands Club Doncaster Road.
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!

LostHeritage
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed 03 Jun, 2009 7:08 pm

Postby LostHeritage » Thu 04 Jun, 2009 12:54 am

blackprince wrote: bigpants wrote: blackprince - really good link you posted there. it lists kippax park which i was going to mention, i think it was in the field next to ours but i need to check. i remember seeing the pics before of it, such a shame as it was what i would call a "proper" stately home. Glad you liked the link.I notice that quite a few of the houses mentioned in this thread are not on this list. I suppose what constitutes a stately home is a bit subjective. Does it have to be of architectural interest, historical interest and have large estates to qualify? Its a pity more of the lost houses listed don't have photos. HiThis is a fascinating thread and I appreciate your interest in my Lost Heritage website.BlackPrince: you are correct in that many houses would rightly be considered large houses aren't on my list as I have tried to focus on those which were 'country estates' rather than the larger suburban villas - unfortunately there are just too many.The lost country houses of Yorkshire has been comprehensively covered in a series of books by Edward Waterson and others which, although out of print, are usually available second hand via Amazon or eBay or abebooks. There are also several Yorkshire houses in Giles Worsley's 'England's Lost Houses'.I have many books on this topic, so if you would like information on a specific house please just say either here or email me on contact@lostheritage.org.uk and I'll see what I can find and either post it here or on my website. I do also have access to many photos of these houses which I can't post on the website for copyright reasons but would be happy to scan and email you privately. I would also be grateful for any information anyone can contribute to expand or fill in the gaps on my list. Kind regards Matt
Brandy
Posts: 1550
Joined: Wed 21 Feb, 2007 8:03 am

Postby Brandy » Thu 04 Jun, 2009 1:27 am

Thanks dave and blackprinceIve put a pic of the area as is now from google earth along with a map of the area from 1854 and by my reckoning i wasnt far off with the location being on the site of the B&Q.Infact its more closer to the site of the carpet shop.I might try and track down some of the work of george walker,it should be interesting!according to what ive found out so far the area that is now occupied by the offices at the side of the complex used to be a large lake that was formed by damning the stream that flows into the small pond that is there to this day!fascinating eh?ps/excellent site you have put together matt by the way
Attachments
__TFMF_1jybbf55xxrau0vaeibnbj45_bc23aab7-740c-4455-a419-276173f62d56_0_main.jpg
__TFMF_1jybbf55xxrau0vaeibnbj45_bc23aab7-740c-4455-a419-276173f62d56_0_main.jpg (116.34 KiB) Viewed 2590 times
There are only 10 types of people in the world -those who understand binary, and those that don't.





Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests