How change is now given when paying cash.

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blackprince
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby blackprince » Mon 01 Oct, 2018 8:52 am

Nice photo Buffaloskinner, reminds me what a decent set of coins we had pre-decimalisation. My particular favourite was the brass threepenny bit. Not too many of the silver 3d coins passed through my little hands in the 50s so I expect they were a rarity. The crown coin I suspect was only issued in commemorative sets, I don't recall seeing one in general use. This reminds me that I have a couple of commemorative crowns somewhere, must dig them out.
Some things used to be priced in Guineas ( 21/-) Try explaining that to the youngsters!
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It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
Loiner in Cyprus
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby Loiner in Cyprus » Mon 01 Oct, 2018 10:26 am

When I was at school, Potternewton Lane CP, in the 50s we were asked to donate "ship halfpennies" to a charity the school supported. I cannot remember what the charity was.
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blackprince
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby blackprince » Mon 01 Oct, 2018 3:36 pm

blackprince wrote:Some things used to be priced in guineas ( 21/-) Try explaining that to the youngsters!


My explanation - It was a bit like VAT before anybody had invented VAT. Also it was a tax on the rich upper classes ( before anyone had heard of Jeremy Corbin) because ordinary folk buying every day items in Thrift or the COOP paid in LSD but rich folks buying luxury goods ( eg buying a fur coat in Lewis's) paid in Guineas. In gambling, your ordinary punter might win a few quid but toffs would win 1000 Guineas, hence the name of the horserace. ( They weren't betting on Guinea pig races!).
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
harrym1byt
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby harrym1byt » Mon 01 Oct, 2018 4:46 pm

blackprince wrote:Some things used to be priced in Guineas ( 21/-) Try explaining that to the youngsters!


There was actually a separate coinage based on the gold guinea, introduced after the civil war with a value equivalent to the pound. The guinea was actually used in the American colonies too. Later in 1717 the value of the guinea settled at 21/- and later than that the actual coin fell out of use, but the 21/- value (and multiples) continued to be frequently used.

200 guineas sounds much less than £200 + 200s = £210.

jma
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby jma » Mon 01 Oct, 2018 5:10 pm

I remember farthings being used at some point after WWII when the price of a loaf which was still controlled went up. I was born in 1944 and it must have been when I was old enough to run errands to the corner shop:-

In the years after the Second World War, the farthing had seen more use, as the standard one-pound (.45 kg) bread loaf had its price set by government, and the price included an odd halfpenny; thus a cash transaction for the purchase of a half-pound loaf by itself required a farthing, either with the payment or change.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_o ... h_farthing
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Leodian
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby Leodian » Wed 03 Oct, 2018 9:58 pm

I recall as a kid going to a local corner shop baker in east Leeds in what would have been the late 1940s to buy tiny loaves at a 1/4d (farthing) each. They were about the size as a small bread roll now and I think (not sure with the passing of time) that they had the Hovis name baked on them. They were eaten almost as soon as they were baked (mum still baked larger types of bread).

PS. Talking of the change from LSD to decimal currency I've tried and found it very hard to readily calculate now in LSD! :o.

PPS. After posting I noticed this was my 6000 post! I hope at least some have been interesting ;).
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
iansmithofotley
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby iansmithofotley » Thu 04 Oct, 2018 11:20 am

Hi Leodian,

Well done for reaching 6000 posts. Personally, I always enjoy your contributions and all of the photographs which you have posted, which are much appreciated. I am sure that many other members feel the same.

Ian
volvojack
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby volvojack » Thu 04 Oct, 2018 12:14 pm

Good Morning Leodian,
Echoing Ians post i too enjoy your photos etc. although i have not been a member for that length of time.
On the subject of going switching to decimal i had, like many others. had to contend with converting L.s.d. and Ounces to Kilos. As a Greengrocer in Morley Market it was a problem even up to a year or so after explaining that we had gone decimal. Old Ladies used to just open their purses whilst looking blank whilst others referred to it as "Funny Money". Down in the Wholesale Fruit Market on Pontefract Lane it was a nightmare at first with so many things in boxes/ etc.different weights etc. and you would have to convert that to old money to see if it was a good deal.
One sad thing was that the Australian and New Zealand apples, which had been beautiful were no more and we were deluged with watery French "Golden Delicious".

harrym1byt
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby harrym1byt » Thu 04 Oct, 2018 2:29 pm

Leodian wrote:I recall as a kid going to a local corner shop baker in east Leeds in what would have been the late 1940s to buy tiny loaves at a 1/4d (farthing) each. They were about the size as a small bread roll now and I think (not sure with the passing of time) that they had the Hovis name baked on them.


I remember those too, I half remember there was a bakers shop on the right somewhere as you walked up Tong Road, where my mother would get one for us if we were passing. Who needed butter, they were fine just as they were - still warm.

I still love my bread as much as I ever did, but you can't seem to get the same freshness or taste these days.
volvojack
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Re: How change is now given when paying cash.

Postby volvojack » Thu 04 Oct, 2018 4:28 pm

With regards to Leodian and Harry's posts i too recall those corner shops where they baked their own bread on the premises. I went to Mount St Mary's School on Richmond Hill. and the Dinners were foul. They were delivered to the School anytime between 11am and 12.30pm. If i had any money i would go up to a Confectionary . Bakers shop just below the Richmond Pub on South Accommodation Road and buy a 2d. Bloomer,go into the Fish and Chip shop next door and buy 2d. Chips sit on a wall and as Harry says one did not need butter (although in my case butter was still on ration.) as in most cases the bread was still warm

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