Then and now.

Off-topic discussions, musings and chat
volvojack
PostsCOLON 777
JoinedCOLON Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Then and now.

Postby volvojack » Sat 31 Dec, 2016 5:13 pm

1959 was a great time for me, my Pals and i were down the Mecca Locarno in the County Arcade two or three times a week, Rock and Roll had really taken off and we were bopping / jiving hours on end. Pubs like the White Horse, York Road and the Haddon Hall up Kirkstall were heaving on a Saturday night, if you were not in the Music room by 7.30 that was it. Thinking back the Landlords must have been earning a small fortune.
Most definitely The Good Old Days for me.
jma
PostsCOLON 165
JoinedCOLON Fri 05 Aug, 2016 3:38 pm

Re: Then and now.

Postby jma » Sun 01 Jan, 2017 10:54 am

The point about The Good Old Days was that it was meant to recapture something of the even earlier golden era of late Victorian and Edwardian times. Although the programme brought fame to the City Varieties, I don't think anybody has mentioned the theatre's rather seedy reputation as the nearest thing to a strip joint under the old legislation when immobile, supposedly artistic "tableaux" were the only permitted public displays of bare flesh. It was before my time, in that to a younger teenager Leeds City Varieties had a nudge, nudge, wink, wink, reputation, confirmed by "tasteful" picture of topless women displayed outside, but we would have been much too young to have even attempted to get in to see a show.
volvojack
PostsCOLON 777
JoinedCOLON Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Then and now.

Postby volvojack » Sun 01 Jan, 2017 12:04 pm

You are spot on there jma. with your statement. it had reputation although i remember going a couple of times with my brother who was a variety agent and at certain times he would have acts on his books who on their tour of cities throughout the U.K. would work a week at the Varieties. most of the evening was of the normal entertainment but then in the latter half of the show the cutains would open and close to a voiceover announcing some like "Evening in Paris" and some naked girl would sit /stand on pedastel there would be about a dozen or so, the same girls over and that was it. The Raincoat Brigade were always in attendance down at the front .
The pictures outside also gave this theatre a seedy impression as did being up an alley. The front doors on the Headrow were never used as i recall. In its defence it is where a lot of comedians, singers and show business folks learned their trade.
jma
PostsCOLON 165
JoinedCOLON Fri 05 Aug, 2016 3:38 pm

Re: Then and now.

Postby jma » Sun 01 Jan, 2017 9:55 pm

They'd leave the theatre to catch a bus home, ...


I wonder how often that was the case, even in the 1950's. AFAIK, the audience wore their own victorian or edwardian style clothing rather like a re-enactment society. Towards the end of the programme's long run - early 1980's - I was walking along the Headrow one Sunday evening when people were arriving, all togged up, for the filming of a show. Hard to imagine anybody going on a bus in what was essentially fancy dress, even then.

This has had me thinking how people got tickets or how they were selected. Presumably there was some sort of system to ensure they looked the part. Going back to the early days of the programme, I remember my mother knew a couple who were regulars and they lived in Great Preston, near Allerton Bywater. He had a company car.

I suspect there's a big attraction in being on the telly, which must have been even stronger in those early days. Not everybody in the audience was picked out by the cameras. My mother's friends were miffed that they were never actually on screen, although I suspect my mother was secretly rather pleased.

dogduke
PostsCOLON 1257
JoinedCOLON Thu 03 Jan, 2008 6:47 am

Re: Then and now.

Postby dogduke » Sun 01 Jan, 2017 10:10 pm

I think(may be wrong) that the Varieties was filmed over 2 sessions on different days.
Those attending had to wear the same togs and sit in the same place.
Consciousness: That annoying time between naps.

90% of being smart is knowing what you're dumb at.



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