Coal Fires.

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volvojack
PostsCOLON 488
JoinedCOLON Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby volvojack » Fri 16 Dec, 2016 2:25 pm

iansmithofotley wroteColonHi Jack,

There are a couple of current threads about Burlington Place on Facebook (Memories of Leeds), which might be of interest to you :

https://www.facebook.com/groups/MemoriesOfLeeds/

Ian
Thanks Ian but i am not on Facebook, is there anyway i can seee this elsewhere ?


(My Nephew is shortly finishing his training to join the force and has been told he will be stationed at Elland Road. Any advice please.))
jma
PostsCOLON 110
JoinedCOLON Fri 05 Aug, 2016 3:38 pm

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby jma » Fri 16 Dec, 2016 5:11 pm

volvojack

During my 30 years service I was offered all sorts of advice, including some I quoted on the thread about police officers' numbers. One you might consider passing on was from the then chief constable of Halifax who was the inspecting officer at my passing out parade in October, 1967. in his speech he mentioned that we would get all sorts of advice when we returned to our respective forces and during our careers. He said to look at the person giving the advice and think "Do I want to be like them?" If the answer was "yes" then the advice was worth following.

I hope all goes well for your nephew: Leeds 11 has changed somewhat since I used to disappear up my own exhaust pipe driving a panda car round what used to be 69 and 70 beats (including the site of the new police station.) Policing has also changed and it's reassuring that there's a younger generation taking on the new challenges.

PS As this is about coal fires, I'll allow myself to reminisce. A couple of us were sent to a "concern for neighbours" call where a couple of elderly people had not been seen. The house was just off Beeston Town Street. Both were alive, but in bed because they were very cold because the landlord had installed a solid fuel fire which they did not know how to light. We got the fire going a treat and the neighbours were rallying round. Then somebody came downstairs with some money by way of thanks from the elderly couple. Obviously, we refused it but it was one of the very few things that ever had me crying, and it still does if I think about it.
volvojack
PostsCOLON 488
JoinedCOLON Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby volvojack » Fri 16 Dec, 2016 5:54 pm

Going off topic for a minute or so not only is my nephew to pass out and begin his Police career but down here in Gloucester we rent out a house (our pension) to a really bright lad who has been a Post Office driver, he also now on his training course for the Force and will finish hopefully the end of January.
When you mention the old Dewsbury Road Station it reminds me of one time i was sat having a drink in Cross Flstts Club when one of the local lads came in quite worse for wear from drink, he was carrying a Siamese cat and the poor thing was starving. as there was a fish and chip shop opposite i went and got two fish. it devoured them , by this time he realised he could not take this cat home as he had a large dog (Back to Back house), he was going to let it go but i agreed to take it home, put it in the garage as we had a cat already. aftr a day of making enquiries i decided to take it to the Police Station, it was hard work getting this evil looking, spitting and scratching animal into a cardboard box and off we went.. The Big Copper on the desk said "What do youe expect us to do with it, it will escape through the bars" (obviously a frustrated comedian, though i did not mention that)
It all ended very well 'cos when i called in before having a pint in the Junction across the road the same Bobby told me the Station Cleaner had fallen in love with it and taken it home.
trophy
PostsCOLON 150
JoinedCOLON Sun 04 May, 2008 11:21 am

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby trophy » Fri 16 Dec, 2016 6:25 pm

i remember the fire being converted to smokeless fuel,this involved running gas to the fire for lighting the fuel also electric for a fan it would have been cheaper to fit a gas fire but the fire back boiler provided hot water.

Loiner in Cyprus
PostsCOLON 199
JoinedCOLON Thu 08 Nov, 2007 3:04 pm

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby Loiner in Cyprus » Fri 16 Dec, 2016 9:15 pm

My fond memories of coal fires back in the 50s and 60s in a council house in Potternewton was how nice the jacket potatoes tasted having been on the fire. We used to eat the burnt skin as well and finish up with black ash around your mouth and lips. And appropriately for this time of year we did roast chestnuts on the fire bricks on either side of the fire.
iansmithofotley
PostsCOLON 327
JoinedCOLON Fri 28 Dec, 2007 4:10 pm

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby iansmithofotley » Sat 17 Dec, 2016 12:10 am

volvojack wroteColon
iansmithofotley wroteColonHi Jack,

There are a couple of current threads about Burlington Place on Facebook (Memories of Leeds), which might be of interest to you :

https://www.facebook.com/groups/MemoriesOfLeeds/

Ian
Thanks Ian but i am not on Facebook, is there anyway i can seee this elsewhere ?


(My Nephew is shortly finishing his training to join the force and has been told he will be stationed at Elland Road. Any advice please.))




Hi Jack,

I don’t think that you can access Facebook without joining. Personally, I am not into ‘social networking’ and I joined because of my interests in nostalgia-type posts and photographs. Also, there are ‘groups’ for many of my hobbies and interests. Many clubs, sports clubs and societies used to have their own websites (and still do) at a cost whereas they can use Facebook ‘groups’ for the same purposes for free. Other than using your email address and a password to join, you do not have to disclose any other information about yourself. You can set your security and settings very tightly so that nobody can find out anything about you. You don’t have to have any ‘friends’ and can decline, or ignore, any such offers from other people. As mentioned, I joined only for access, particularly for my interests and hobbies. It is also very useful for seeking information about almost anything. I am sure that you would enjoy Facebook if you joined and if you didn’t like it, you could leave.

The posts, which I referred to on the Facebook Group ‘Memories of Leeds’, was about 19 Burlington Place in the 1950’s and 1980’s and a family called Priestley, and there were contributions from people who lived in the area at the time. The ‘Memories of Leeds’ page is a ‘closed group’ so access can only be gained by a member of that Facebook group (it is simple to join any ‘closed group’, just by clicking ‘join group’ but you might have to wait a few hours for approval).

So far as relates to your nephew joining the Police Service, I am so much out of touch with modern day policing that I don’t think that I can offer any constructive advice other than ‘work hard, play hard, always try your best to do your duty and enjoy it. Also, always ‘watch your back’ not only when dealing with the public but also from other people within the force’.

Ian
volvojack
PostsCOLON 488
JoinedCOLON Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby volvojack » Mon 19 Dec, 2016 1:48 pm

Good Morning Ian,
Thanks for your reply and advice but my wife and daughter having had a bad experience on Facebook will not let an old dodderer like me on there at any price. It''s a shame really as i lived at No. 17 Burlinton Place from 1960 for about six years or so.
Also have passed on your advice ref. my Nephew.
Regards andd a Happy Christmas to you and your family.
Jack Daly.
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Leodian
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Re: Coal Fires.

Postby Leodian » Mon 19 Dec, 2016 7:10 pm

The talk of coal fires had made me recall the methods used to get a coal fire going, which could be no mean feat. A usually reliable way was to use a fire lighter stick or two (I wonder what they were made from?). Another method was to use short sticks of wood that had been chopped to the same size and coming in a bundle tied together with a piece of twisted wire (the burning wood also gave off some heat until it burnt out). Another method was to use pieces of newspaper that had been individually twisted to be tight but not too tight (they would not burn if the latter) and so lasted long enough (but not always) to start the coal burning.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

trophy
PostsCOLON 150
JoinedCOLON Sun 04 May, 2008 11:21 am

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby trophy » Mon 19 Dec, 2016 7:23 pm

Leodian wroteColonThe talk of coal fires had made me recall the methods used to get a coal fire going, which could be no mean feat. A usually reliable way was to use a fire lighter stick or two (I wonder what they were made from?). Another method was to use short sticks of wood that had been chopped to the same size and coming in a bundle tied together with a piece of twisted wire (the burning wood also gave off some heat until it burnt out). Another method was to use pieces of newspaper that had been individually twisted to be tight but not too tight (they would not burn if the latter) and so lasted long enough (but not always) to start the coal burning.

we had a device called a draw tin ,this consisted a square piece of tin with an handle which covered the fireplace this caused the chimney draught to be pulled from underneath the fire,i have seen a large newspaper being used which usually resuted in the paper catching fire. :lol:
volvojack
PostsCOLON 488
JoinedCOLON Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Coal Fires.

Postby volvojack » Tue 20 Dec, 2016 11:14 am

]The talk of coal fires had made me recall the methods used to get a coal fire going, which could be no mean feat. A usually reliable way was to use a fire lighter stick or two (I wonder what they were made from?). Another method was to use short sticks of wood that had been chopped to the same size and coming in a bundle tied together with a piece of twisted wire (the burning wood also gave off some heat until it burnt out). Another method was to use pieces of newspaper that had been individually twisted to be tight but not too tight (they would not burn if the latter) and so lasted long enough (but not always) to start the coal burning.
"Short sticks of wood chopped to the same size and coming in a bundle tied with twisted wire" you were obviously well off to afford these Chips as they were referred as. we had to content ourselves with chopping up whatever bits of wood we could get our hands on,

Cold but Hapy days.

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