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Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 8:33 pm
by jdbythesea
I was having a New Year tipple with four friends last night. Some were older than me and some were younger (I'm 66). What we all had in common though was our Leeds roots. I mentioned that when I was younger and less wise, it was not too uncommon for grown men to get stoated (or stoted) when celebrating events such as the turn of the year. Surprisingly, none of those present had heard of the word. I haven't heard it myself in a long time but feel sure it's not a word that I have invented. Where does it originate from?
Happy New Year to everybody in the SL family.

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 9:00 pm
by liits
The urbandictionary.com gives this definition;

"To get so drunk you perceive inanimate objects as stoats or other woodland animals, and punch them out of fear
I got so stoated last night, the little b*******s were everywhere!"

I think that's rubbish.
I'd always understood that it was to be so drunk as to appear far away or mesmerised as one would be by a stoat - if you were a rabbit.....

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 9:03 pm
by j.c.d.
Having been fortunate enough to have done 60 years or so of beer drinking, I am now just over 80) I can honestly say that though I have heard that word used to describe a session of over drinking I would also say that I do not think it is used a great deal in Leeds.
I could furbish you probably with quite a list , both rude and not so describing drunk etc.
Just a though,t maybe it originally was Bloated and some how it is now Stoated.
Regards Jack Daly.

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 9:04 pm
by tyke bhoy
Not imagined as I have heard it too as does the person who posted this http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Stoated

I've no idea of its origin but if the urbandictionary origin is correct it would be rural

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 9:37 pm
by j.c.d.
tyke bhoy wroteColonNot imagined as I have heard it too as does the person who posted this http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Stoated

I've no idea of its origin but if the urbandictionary origin is correct it would be rural




This sounds the more likely.

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 10:24 pm
by jim
For what it's worth, I have only ever heard it on the Rab C Nesbitt programme!

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Sun 03 Jan, 2016 11:25 pm
by Dalehelms
Following on from Jim's post, Glasgow slang for describing heavy rain is....."stoatin' aff the grun so it is". I don't think we use it to describe being very drunk though. "Stoating" means bouncing. You "stoat" a ball. Hope that Glasgow slang is permitted in this thread!

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Mon 04 Jan, 2016 8:49 am
by Geordie-exile
Similar to the Glaswegian word stoating is the Geordie term 'stotting' meaning bouncing, as with a ball off a wall. It's also used to describe someone drunk - 'he was absolutely stottin' . I suppose that would suggest someone bumping into walls as they go along.

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Mon 04 Jan, 2016 11:17 am
by j.c.d.
From what I am told "Real Ale" can cost as much as £6 a pint in City Centre pubs so I don't imagine there would be much getting Stoated anymore, or am I completely out of touch with modern drinking.

Re: Slang

PostedCOLON Mon 04 Jan, 2016 11:35 am
by tyke bhoy
j.c.d. wroteColonFrom what I am told "Real Ale" can cost as much as £6 a pint in City Centre pubs so I don't imagine there would be much getting Stoated anymore, or am I completely out of touch with modern drinking.
I think, other than upmarket hotels, that sort of price only relates to the new "craft beer" craze which is also usually Keg rather than cask too. Most cask beer is £3-4 per pint even in Tapped which I think is the biggest Keg beer outlet in the City Centre. It may be challenged by the Brew Dog establishment at the junction of North Street and Vicar Lane which from my one visit didn't appear to do cask at all.