Slang

Off-topic discussions, musings and chat
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blackprince
Posts: 660
Joined: Tue 04 Sep, 2007 2:10 pm

Re: Slang

Postby blackprince » Sat 10 Mar, 2018 5:12 pm

volvojack wrote:I know that Laikin' Is a Yorkshire expression for playing but when i try and Google it, there is not a clear definition.

Also we always used the Expression "Right as Ninepence" meaning we were O.K. Don't know where that came from


Funny you should mention this. A week or two back I was watching a Scandinavian thriller on TV and there was one short sentence about children playing I understood without subtitles because it was pure Yorkshire dialect It sounded like " the bairns were laikin ".
I looked it up and the Swedish for play is "leka" and "leker" , Danish is "lega". So maybe a legacy of the Viking kingdom of Jorvik which covered most of Yorkshire?
More simply, it could just be a corruption of " larking " as in "larking about".
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!
volvojack
Posts: 1035
Joined: Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Slang

Postby volvojack » Sun 11 Mar, 2018 9:22 am

blackprince wrote:
volvojack wrote:I know that Laikin' Is a Yorkshire expression for playing but when i try and Google it, there is not a clear definition.

Also we always used the Expression "Right as Ninepence" meaning we were O.K. Don't know where that came from


Funny you should mention this. A week or two back I was watching a Scandinavian thriller on TV and there was one short sentence about children playing I understood without subtitles because it was pure Yorkshire dialect It sounded like " the bairns were laikin ".
I looked it up and the Swedish for play is "leka" and "leker" , Danish is "lega". So maybe a legacy of the Viking kingdom of Jorvik which covered most of Yorkshire?
More simply, it could just be a corruption of " larking " as in "larking about".

Thankyou for that B.P. It certainly sounds right.
volvojack
Posts: 1035
Joined: Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Slang

Postby volvojack » Wed 04 Apr, 2018 3:51 pm

Further to the expression "Right as Ninepence" meaning 0.K. Another expression "Bent as a Nine Bob Note" means just the opposite. I can understand the second but wonder where the first one originates.


"Sick as a Parrot"
I would bet no one would know where this originates from without referring to Google, etc.
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tilly
Posts: 1803
Joined: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 2:32 pm

Re: Slang

Postby tilly » Wed 04 Apr, 2018 4:22 pm

Hi Jack i have also heard bent has a two bob watch.
No matter were i end my days im an Hunslet lad with Hunslet ways.

dogduke
Posts: 1291
Joined: Thu 03 Jan, 2008 6:47 am

Re: Slang

Postby dogduke » Thu 10 May, 2018 7:40 pm

Does anyone remember a pound £ being called a bar and ten shillngs half a bar ?
Heard it last used roundabout the 60s
Consciousness: That annoying time between naps.

90% of being smart is knowing what you're dumb at.


TABBYCAT
Posts: 190
Joined: Mon 02 Apr, 2007 6:55 pm

Re: Slang

Postby TABBYCAT » Thu 10 May, 2018 8:54 pm

dogduke wrote:Does anyone remember a pound £ being called a bar and ten shillngs half a bar ?
Heard it last used roundabout the 60s



Yup use the terms even now especially when throwing shrapnel into the pot playing three card brag.
volvojack
Posts: 1035
Joined: Tue 26 Jan, 2016 11:57 am

Re: Slang

Postby volvojack » Thu 10 May, 2018 11:06 pm

Oh, dogduke and TABBYCAT,
Such Memories of all these, especially as this amount of money coould mean the difference between "Flush or Borracic"
There was a Regular lot of us used to play three card brag upstairs in the Lido Club, Albion Walk on a Friday night
it was Half a crown to start the Pot so if there was about 8 players we would all throw in Half a Dollar and the Pole who was employed by the Club to Deal and make sure everything went smoothly used to take out 2/6 each time and then again take the same amount when the Pot went to the winner. As this went on for a few hours unless one was extremely lucky just about everyone in the early hours of the morning was feeling the effects of the game, plus the alcohol being served did not help the ambience so after a while my Pal and I would go down stairs and make our way home.
Leodian
Posts: 5967
Joined: Thu 10 Jun, 2010 8:03 am

Re: Slang

Postby Leodian » Wed 16 May, 2018 8:31 pm

Spuggies/spuggys for sparrows.

Sparrow numbers have fallen for many years now but one place there are still quite a few is in the Navigation Walk/Victoria Quay area near to Leeds Bridge. I thought of that word for sparrows when I was having a walk through that area yesterday (May 15 2018) and noticed several sparrows then (and other times in recent months). I wonder if their numbers are even rising as I have seen a few (but not many) recently in local areas where I've not spotted them for a long time.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

urban rambler
Posts: 43
Joined: Tue 04 Jun, 2013 8:11 am

Re: Slang

Postby urban rambler » Wed 16 May, 2018 9:14 pm

I recently sorted through some old photo albums, and a newspaper cutting fell out dated 11th July 1987 from the Yorkshire Post ‘Old Yorkshire Diary’.
I must have kept it as a photo showing the regulars of the Ingram Arms in Newtown was printed as part of the article which must have been taken at the same time as the two I have. My Grandmother’s two brothers and her father were in all of them.
The article mentions ‘Fratching – or rows, was a great entertainment in Newtown’.
I also thought middins was a local slang, until it was used on archaeology programs on TV.
dogduke
Posts: 1291
Joined: Thu 03 Jan, 2008 6:47 am

Re: Slang

Postby dogduke » Wed 16 May, 2018 11:37 pm

Was born in Newtown and remember the word fratching.
I think it usually applied to a couple,married or courting "they were always fratching"

Don't know if it was only used in Newtown though.

Middins,the bin men today don't know they are born,they would not stick it for an hour never mind a full shift and a six day
working week
Happy days though
Consciousness: That annoying time between naps.

90% of being smart is knowing what you're dumb at.



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