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Posted: Sun 10 Oct, 2010 12:10 am
by STICKS
does anyone remember this one,Kick can and hook it.

Posted: Sun 10 Oct, 2010 12:58 am
by weenie
STICKS wrote:
does anyone remember this one,Kick can and hook it.


we use to play a game called Kick can and hop it..

Posted: Sun 10 Oct, 2010 9:23 pm
by trophy
you want t' spice cake and ha'penny an'all.    

cos its springtime in the rockies.

its a thing of purpose for ducks to peak on

some of my grandmas sayings
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Posted: Mon 11 Oct, 2010 3:52 am
by zip55
3 card brag sayings:

Prile - for 3 of a kind

Ten Joe Green - for Ten Jack Queen

Anybody know where the latter came from?

Posted: Sun 06 Nov, 2011 12:11 pm
by jdbythesea
Brandy wrote:
I used to wotk with an old irish fella who,when puzzled by something used to come out with 'well oi'l f**k my boots'
It used to crack me right up lolRegular Smiley    



I know this is an old link but variations on the exclamation of surprise that Brandy quoted and that I remember and still use are:

"Well, f*** me gently with a ragman's trumpet!"

and

"B**ger me pink!"

Another expression that I remember when the weather looked a bit rain-threatening was - "it's looking a bit black ovver bi t'wife's mothers!" I haven't heard that for years.

One that my mum used to use regularly when she didn't believe something was - "it's all me Aunt Kate" or "it's all me eye and Peggy Martin!". Thankfully, my missus continues the tradition and uses both.

(Apologies if these already appear elsewhere)

Posted: Sun 06 Nov, 2011 3:01 pm
by stutterdog
Uno Hoo wrote:
Johnny39 wrote:
Question:

"Where did that come from?"

Answer:

"Up a nick in Russia."

Don't know where it came from but it was a very popular answer years ago!



My brother-in-law, Bradford born and bred, used to give the reply "up a nick i' Bowlin'" as his answer, so there must be a common thread somewhere. Bowling is part of Bradford, so maybe the alleged location of the "nick" varied according to locality of the speaker?

Sounds similar to one my mother used ,"Up a nick in Briggate"

Re: Odd sayings

Posted: Thu 31 Aug, 2017 9:28 pm
by Greglister
My grandma used to say "icky plush, the man with the velvet arse". I used to think it meant she had forgotten someone's name, and was making it up. Ha 30 years late he's a boogie man.

Re: Odd sayings

Posted: Fri 01 Sep, 2017 5:21 pm
by volvojack
Greglister wrote:My grandma used to say "icky plush, the man with the velvet arse". I used to think it meant she had forgotten someone's name, and was making it up. Ha 30 years late he's a boogie man.



Thanks a lot Greglister for posting this today. Though i am happily wading through the Secret Leeds Forums i do not think i would have found this for some time if ever.
I have read the lot from start to finish and i've been laughing my socks off. the tears have been rolling down my cheeks seeing so many quotes that my Grandmother,Parents and Family used.
Our Lass, who is from Bristol in the West Country has a good sense of humour as a rule, but came over to see what i was laughing at and was quite puzzled by the majority of the Yorkshire. "Quotations".
Many Thanks once again.

The Irish Landlord of the Coach and Horses, the Junction of Elland Rd. and Beeston Rd. used say, quite regularly "Ah Well, As One Door Closes, Another One Shuts"......this was usually to one of his Irish customers who had lost his job.

Re: Odd sayings

Posted: Fri 01 Sep, 2017 6:25 pm
by volvojack
Many years ago when we used to play doubles at Dominoes in a W.M.C. in Beeston there was a lad Robin Carr who when a number reappeared at one end which he was not too happy about he used to say "Ay Ay Cats at 't Meat" which was a signal to his Partner to shift it if he could.
If reprimanded over this habit and he had denied it he might get "A Nods as good as a Wink to a Blind 'Oss " from an opponent.