Pompocali

The green spaces and places of Leeds
rikj
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Postby rikj » Thu 07 Feb, 2008 11:54 am

When you ask Leeds folk if they've ever been to Pompocali, the usual answer is "Pompo-what?" Given that it's such a large and unusual thing it's relatively unknown.

Hopefully the attached pic shows the nature of the beast. A series of banked earthworks in a pattern that doesn't really indicate its purpose or history.

I first saw the name on a map a few years ago and couldn't find out anything about the place, I think google only gave 2 hits. Now there are still only 70 odd. Its proximity to the paths of old Roman roads has generally led to the theory (or legend) that it was a Roman encampment.

Fortunately a local lady has done some fine amateur achaeology and there is now plausible evidence that the mounds are the removed over-burden from gritstone quarrying. The banking is to prevent the spoil from slumping. Why the mounds are shaped as they are is still a matter for conjecture.

Insert 10p for link

However, there are still various explanations being put forward as to the history of Pompocali. A SSSI designation for the nearby Hetchell Crags describes Pompocali as a quarry disused since the 18C. Who knows? Various pics on the net. I took some but its difficult to capture the scale.
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Si
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Location: Otley

Postby Si » Thu 07 Feb, 2008 1:34 pm

Very interesting. I'm not sure if those banks/ridges are a result of the way the spoil was tipped. They can be seen on many steep grassy slopes and are actually caused by slumping. The name Pompocali is unusual. It doesn't sound Yorkshire, or even English. It sounds of Italian origin to me - Romans? And why would a spoil heap be given a name at all? I suppose it would need a proper archaeological dig to try to date it.
David Raven
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Postby David Raven » Thu 07 Feb, 2008 6:54 pm

'Pompocali's location is where the geology changes from sandstone to magnesian limestone. Although there are outcrops of the sandstone there, I wonder if 'Pompocali' is actually what remains of a limestone quarry.

I visited a couple of years ago to take some photographs, and the terrain reminded me of parts of a limestone quarry near a village where I grew up, a bit further south of here on the same ridge of magnesian limestone (Roach Hills, near Kippax).

Cheers
Dave
Inquirer
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Postby Inquirer » Mon 11 Feb, 2008 9:55 am


Pompocali is marked on many antique maps of Yorkshire as the junction point of presumed Roman roads. But there is no evidence that it is ancient site at all. An article in the Thoresby Society's annual journal some years ago suggested the name and its supposed ancient history was all an 18th century creation.

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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Fri 27 Jan, 2012 9:29 pm

I had thought of doing a thread on Pompocali but I found this one.

Pompocali is an intriguing place and well worth a visit in nice weather. It surprises me that, as far as I am aware, there is still no consensus as to what the site was. It is often stated to be the site a Roman fort at a Roman road, which crosses Bardsey Beck at a nearby ford. Though I don't know if it is the same road the course of it does correlate fairly close to that of the Roman road that passes from near Adel to Alwoodley and then beyond.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
Jogon
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Postby Jogon » Sat 28 Jan, 2012 2:19 pm

Leo
from expeditions (too many) years ago, I seem to recall there was a farm and watermill just next to that. The mill had some sort of kiln or fired oven which may have been linked to the earthworks. Accessed from Thorner Ln track under (disused) Rlway bridge.

You may enjoy this a book by Richard Fortey ISBN-10: 0712660402 'The Hidden Landscape: Journey into the Geological Past'.

The rocks determine the buildings, the minerals the food and thus the people etc. It relates scenery to the underlying geology.
Not a light text but gave me a better understanding of Britain.
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Steve Jones
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Postby Steve Jones » Sat 28 Jan, 2012 2:24 pm

Where exactly is this place?
I would be interested in taking a look at it.
Steve Jones
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Jogon
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Postby Jogon » Sat 28 Jan, 2012 2:28 pm

Next to (south of) Hetchell Woods at Bardsey
Park up at Milner Lane just to the east.

Don't build your hopes up too much.

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=hetchell+woods+leeds&hl=en&ll=53.876619,-1.428051&spn=0.028083,0.053473&hnear=Hetchell+Wood&t=h&z=14    

Think it found fame 'cos someone linked it to Roman Road Scarcroft>Alwoodley>Adel>Cookridge

Even back then, they walked some of the finest Golf Courses in England.    

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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Sat 28 Jan, 2012 3:55 pm

Jogon wrote:
Leo
from expeditions (too many) years ago, I seem to recall there was a farm and watermill just next to that. The mill had some sort of kiln or fired oven which may have been linked to the earthworks. Accessed from Thorner Ln track under (disused) Rlway bridge.

You may enjoy this a book by Richard Fortey ISBN-10: 0712660402 'The Hidden Landscape: Journey into the Geological Past'.

The rocks determine the buildings, the minerals the food and thus the people etc. It relates scenery to the underlying geology.
Not a light text but gave me a better understanding of Britain.


It could be at least 20 years back when I first came across the area and much of the old mill structure was still visible but the site fell into further decay and is now very overgrown and not at all obvious there was a mill there. I recall that where the water driven wheel would have been was still very obvious (the wheel had gone when I first saw the site). The old rail track, the site of the mill, Pompocali, Hetchell Wood and Hetchell Crags are all part of a short but fine circular walk from and back to Bardsey. Regular Smiley
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
Tyke
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Postby Tyke » Sun 29 Jan, 2012 6:28 pm

But of a coincidence but I was searching for local walks this morning and came upon this.

http://www.theaa.com/walks/bardsey-and-pompocali-421274
Hunslet born and bread

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