The Flooding Aire

The green spaces and places of Leeds
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chameleon
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Postby chameleon » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 7:40 pm

I don't think anyone is left in any doubt about the torture, loss and interuption to normal life that flooding brings after what we've seen this last few years.

Equally everyone would want the authorities to do all they can to prevent this happening to them. Clearly with this in mind, the Environment Agency has looked at Leeds and come up with doubtless necessary but quite alarming proposals. This is the most recent article about it from the YEP:

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/Opinions-could-flood-in-on.5016804.jp

As more information has come to light, the original sensationalist suggestions that the river would grow a 4M high wall along its whole length throughout Leeds have been mitigated. Non the less, it looks as though that in time to come, the river bank could significantly change from the way we see it now.

What effect is this to have on the regeneration projects and waterside heritage?
sundowner
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Postby sundowner » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 8:22 pm

chameleon wrote:
I don't think anyone is left in any doubt about the torture, loss and interuption to normal life that flooding brings after what we've seen this last few years.

Equally everyone would want the authorities to do all they can to prevent this happening to them. Clearly with this in mind, the Environment Agency has looked at Leeds and come up with doubtless necessary but quite alarming proposals. This is the most recent article about it from the YEP:

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/Opinions-could-flood-in-on.5016804.jp

As more information has come to light, the original sensationalist suggestions that the river would grow a 4M high wall along its whole length throughout Leeds have been mitigated. Non the less, it looks as though that in time to come, the river bank could significantly change from the way we see it now.

What effect is this to have on the regeneration projects and waterside heritage?

Just a thought chameleon what if the river bed was dredge would this help or am i being thick.
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chameleon
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Postby chameleon » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 8:49 pm

sundowner wrote:
chameleon wrote:
I don't think anyone is left in any doubt about the torture, loss and interuption to normal life that flooding brings after what we've seen this last few years.

Equally everyone would want the authorities to do all they can to prevent this happening to them. Clearly with this in mind, the Environment Agency has looked at Leeds and come up with doubtless necessary but quite alarming proposals. This is the most recent article about it from the YEP:

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/Opinions-could-flood-in-on.5016804.jp

As more information has come to light, the original sensationalist suggestions that the river would grow a 4M high wall along its whole length throughout Leeds have been mitigated. Non the less, it looks as though that in time to come, the river bank could significantly change from the way we see it now.

What effect is this to have on the regeneration projects and waterside heritage?

Just a thought chameleon what if the river bed was dredge would this help or am i being thick.


Naah, can't do that - probably find Phill exploring the latest lost under-river subway Wink

Sure there'll be a real reason, we need a civeng.
drapesy
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Postby drapesy » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 10:13 pm

chameleon wrote:
sundowner wrote:
chameleon wrote:
I don't think anyone is left in any doubt about the torture, loss and interuption to normal life that flooding brings after what we've seen this last few years.

Equally everyone would want the authorities to do all they can to prevent this happening to them. Clearly with this in mind, the Environment Agency has looked at Leeds and come up with doubtless necessary but quite alarming proposals. This is the most recent article about it from the YEP:

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/Opinions-could-flood-in-on.5016804.jp

As more information has come to light, the original sensationalist suggestions that the river would grow a 4M high wall along its whole length throughout Leeds have been mitigated. Non the less, it looks as though that in time to come, the river bank could significantly change from the way we see it now.

What effect is this to have on the regeneration projects and waterside heritage?

Just a thought chameleon what if the river bed was dredge would this help or am i being thick.


Naah, can't do that - probably find Phill exploring the latest lost under-river subway Wink

Sure there'll be a real reason, we need a civeng.

we need a what????
there are 10 types of people in the world. Those that understand ternary, those that don't and those that think this a joke about the binary system.


Cardiarms
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Postby Cardiarms » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 10:18 pm

Um don't build houses where it might flood bad. Job done.
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chameleon
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Postby chameleon » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 10:18 pm

drapesy wrote:
chameleon wrote:
sundowner wrote:
chameleon wrote:
I don't think anyone is left in any doubt about the torture, loss and interuption to normal life that flooding brings after what we've seen this last few years.

Equally everyone would want the authorities to do all they can to prevent this happening to them. Clearly with this in mind, the Environment Agency has looked at Leeds and come up with doubtless necessary but quite alarming proposals. This is the most recent article about it from the YEP:

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/Opinions-could-flood-in-on.5016804.jp

As more information has come to light, the original sensationalist suggestions that the river would grow a 4M high wall along its whole length throughout Leeds have been mitigated. Non the less, it looks as though that in time to come, the river bank could significantly change from the way we see it now.

What effect is this to have on the regeneration projects and waterside heritage?

Just a thought chameleon what if the river bed was dredge would this help or am i being thick.


Naah, can't do that - probably find Phill exploring the latest lost under-river subway Wink

Sure there'll be a real reason, we need a civeng.

we need a what????


Sorry drapesy - a civil engineer (no, before anyone says it - not the opposite of a rude one!)
raveydavey
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Postby raveydavey » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 10:28 pm

After a previous episode of high waters and flooding, (not the last lot, probably at least 3 or so years ago) there was a letter in the YEP from a chap who used to work for British Waterways when the river was still used by commercial barges.

Apparently then, the river was routinely dredged to keep a much deeper central channel open and he commented on how if that was still being done there wouldn't be the current flood risks.

Certainly my dad who passed away last year used to work for a company (Gailisters?) with premises on The Calls during the 60's and he could recall the river level dropping back during the summer revealing part of the river bed at either side which is another indication that the central channel used to be much deeper, perhaps? Mind you, he also commented on how it used to stink during the summer, which is a sign that not everything in the past was quite so rosy!

Clearly if the river is deeper, then it can accomodate more water before it threatens to breach the banks?

I'm sure they'd be environmental arguments about dredging up the river bed and cost implications, but surely it would be better than building a massive wall along either side? Plus with such a tall wall what would happen if anyone fell in?

Personally, I feel that the story of the 4 metre high wall is alarmist nonsense and it serves simply to make the actual proposal appear more palatable when it is announced.    
Speaking the Truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act – George Orwell
Cardiarms
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Postby Cardiarms » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 11:16 pm

Hydraulics is funny stuff. Shift the water quickly through one place and it all arrives a the same time somewhere else. Hopefully that place has the space for it.

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chameleon
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Postby chameleon » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 11:29 pm

Cardiarms wrote:
Hydraulics is funny stuff. Shift the water quickly through one place and it all arrives a the same time somewhere else. Hopefully that place has the space for it.


Hey, Gail Lister - wine and spirit merchants weren't they? Gran used to get the 'Christmas order' delivered from them!

They ae saying that a 4m wall would only be at Oulton. Very flat there, rather like Kirkstal Valley? Certainly floods easily. As Cardiarms says, if a lot of water arrives in one place suddenly, it needs somewhere to go and with a lot of development proposed there, doubt they'd want any overspill into the surrounding area.
Chrism
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Postby Chrism » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 12:52 pm

There's a flood mark thingy on the wall of Jonas Woodheads on Kirkstall Road. I think it's about a foot up the wall and is the mark from 18??. I suspect the Aire flooded at Kirkstall Abbey and flooded the whole of the road right into town. The marker is on the wall about 20 yards or so from Canal Road as you walk into town. Does anyone have any info on this flooding. I can't remember the exact year on the marker.
Sit thissen dahn an' tell us abaht it.


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