Dialect/slang

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
Johnny39
Posts: 894
Joined: Mon 11 Jun, 2007 3:54 pm

Postby Johnny39 » Fri 05 Oct, 2012 12:23 pm

somme1916 wrote:
Apologies if this has been mentioned in this thread previously,but there's a lot to trawl through !
I just took the black bin out for (hopefully) emptying today and had a quick chat with an old lad down the street.I enquired how he was to which he simply replied "Champion"....I love the use of this word in that context.


Hi Somme, another term of well-being which I remember from far off days and used occasionaly was, on enquiry as to how you were the answer would be "Reet gradely".
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma?
Derculees
Posts: 73
Joined: Tue 17 Jan, 2012 1:21 pm

Postby Derculees » Fri 05 Oct, 2012 1:29 pm

Johnny39 wrote:
somme1916 wrote:
Apologies if this has been mentioned in this thread previously,but there's a lot to trawl through !
I just took the black bin out for (hopefully) emptying today and had a quick chat with an old lad down the street.I enquired how he was to which he simply replied "Champion"....I love the use of this word in that context.


Hi Somme, another term of well-being which I remember from far off days and used occasionaly was, on enquiry as to how you were the answer would be "Reet gradely".


Similarly, 'Fair to Middleton' was a response to the question
Touch not but the glove
Johnny39
Posts: 894
Joined: Mon 11 Jun, 2007 3:54 pm

Postby Johnny39 » Fri 05 Oct, 2012 1:49 pm

Another rather insolent reply on being asked one's well-being was:

Question: "Are you all right?"

Answer: "No, only down one side!"

Some people can get a bit umpty about this.
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma?
Derculees
Posts: 73
Joined: Tue 17 Jan, 2012 1:21 pm

Postby Derculees » Fri 05 Oct, 2012 2:28 pm

'Doytin' was used a lot in Pudsey to describe an old 'gimmer', or old person, not fully aware of their surroundings.
I couldn't 'thoil, ter side pots' couldn't be bothered to clear the table after a meal. 'Thoil' seemed to get upgraded to, I couldn't 'fashion' to,
Maybe with the progress of the, then fashionable, 'teddy boy era'
Touch not but the glove

majorhoundii
Posts: 404
Joined: Sat 12 Mar, 2011 6:55 am

Postby majorhoundii » Sat 06 Oct, 2012 4:28 pm

Johnny39 wrote:
somme1916 wrote:
Apologies if this has been mentioned in this thread previously,but there's a lot to trawl through !
I just took the black bin out for (hopefully) emptying today and had a quick chat with an old lad down the street.I enquired how he was to which he simply replied "Champion"....I love the use of this word in that context.


Hi Somme, another term of well-being which I remember from far off days and used occasionaly was, on enquiry as to how you were the answer would be "Reet gradely".

Gradely is more common the other side of the Pennines, but I have heard it used in Yorkshire. There's a Lancashire poem called "Tommy Stroo's Ghost" that inlcudes it.
The first verse goes:

T'moon were shinin'
Rare 'n breet,
'n t'stars were twinklin' too,
Arve nivver seen a grander neet in I were Tommy Stroo
Ah pulled bed clothes up to mi nose when I sure 'eard sich a din
An' summat bounced across mi toes,
Arve neer felt gradely sin!    
Geordie-exile
Posts: 1356
Joined: Wed 06 Feb, 2008 6:09 pm

Postby Geordie-exile » Wed 13 Mar, 2013 11:33 pm

chomic wrote:
Years ago, when I first started work, when a machine broke down my boss would say 'All we need now is a big hammer and a picture of Lloyd George with a cloth on his head' ????


Just re-reading this thread and found this one hilarious. Where on earth did it come from?
There is enough sadness in life without having fellows like Gussie Fink-Nottle going about in sea boots.
BigSteveF
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun 28 Mar, 2010 9:20 pm

Postby BigSteveF » Thu 14 Mar, 2013 3:46 pm

My Grandma when nearing completion of any task she was undertaking at the time used to say, ( Na then we wain't be long cos t'old donkeys dead). Often wondered where this saying came from.
Leeds born n bred and DJ'd in several Pubs Clubs between 1977 and 1985. ie The Cherry Tree, great times and great people. (Now living in Somerset).
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Thu 21 Mar, 2013 12:25 pm

Caron wrote:
Jogon wrote:
I allus thought 'Spanish' was a stronger version of liquorice. Grandpa was a user, and had a penknife for cutting the stuff.

Hi Jogon. Like you, I thought Spanish was more the woody stuff and Liquorice was the softer black/brown stuff.
My boyfriend often bought me a length of liquorice in the 60's, (they'd have a fancy finger ring knotted at the bottom), we got engaged every week....ahh, happy days!        


When I think of 'Spanish' I think of the bright red long twisty sticks of it...
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.

Johnny39
Posts: 894
Joined: Mon 11 Jun, 2007 3:54 pm

Postby Johnny39 » Thu 21 Mar, 2013 3:41 pm

I was watching one of those Michael Portillo railway journeys the other week on TV and he was in Pontefract. He was visiting a liquorish grower, now retired, and the subject of the name liquorish/spanish came up. The former grower said that the reason it was sometimes called spanish was Spain was the plants country of origin. If this was already known I apologise.
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma?
Jogon
Posts: 3036
Joined: Wed 21 Dec, 2011 1:28 pm

Postby Jogon » Thu 21 Mar, 2013 7:15 pm

Hullo east coast Johnny
How's the weather? We had an icy snap 'smorning -3c here.

Don't apologise, (dint know).

I enjoy those railway journeys, he's right for the part, and good with folks - I especially enjoyed Woodlesford when he chatted with the Rhubarb producer lady.


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