Dialect/slang

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:29 pm

Si wrote: Squat - to hide or put aside.Baba - poo.Gems - (with a hard G) spectacles.Spell - splinter. Haha, baba. Also...bab, lol. "Am off for a bab."
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:32 pm

drapesy wrote: Has anyone mentioned 'spice' for 'sweets' - or 'spanish' for 'licqourice'?? I always knew liquorice as 'Spanish', wonder where that came from?
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:33 pm

granville wrote: Ian R P wrote: Gloit and Gubbins are good words, my mate also says 'finga' a lot for person. He's from Harehills too. Yeah Gloit is a great Yorkshire term for an idiot. What a classic! I want Gloit or Gloyt to get put into the Oxford English dictionary.Also what about chin=to hitIf someone 'got chinned' at school they taken a fist or two. How about to 'knock [edited for content]' out of somebody? That always amused me, I still say it now.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:34 pm

magic wrote: Beefing for crying. Haha, yeah. Calling people a trout as well.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.

Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:37 pm

cnosni wrote: Beefish wrote: somebody told me that div or divvy is short for a divot or lump of earth so it's like calling somebody a clod or should that be clart? My friend from Newcastle had never heard of ginnels until she came to Leeds, when I explained what a ginnel was she said I meant a cut! Our lass is a Scouser and she had never heard of Ginnel either.Is this a Leeds word or is it used around West Yorkshire? Pretty much all of Yorkshire.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:39 pm

arry awk wrote: Nobody's bin on sin' yustady!!!Been thinking about our Leeds dialect in the case of the pronunciation of Bradford and Pudsey.The middle 'D' and 'T' don't get pronounced at all!Say 'em to yourself! They come out (from me) as Bra<h>fordand Pu<h>sey, using an almost silent aspirant. Anybody agree with me?Trawled up a few remembered words and sayings we used Seventy Years ago,and since!Sneck     ; Door latch leverClemmed; ThirstyGeyser    ; Ascot water heater above sink or bathGeezer    ; cantankerous old person! Self included!Bogie     ; Home made steerable cart made from a plank,                 four old pramwheels and string for steering.Bogey     ; Unprintable!Mucky fat ; Lovely dripping from Sunday roast with meat jelly                    left intact! Eaten on real 'doorstep' toast!Pobs         ; warm bread and milk for babies and invalidsMore on next post!Lol. Two friends of mine (both also born and brought up in Armley) say Bratford, one of them moved to Bradford when he was about 13 and he still says Bratford now....I'm from Armley and I say Bradford. Weird, huh?
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:40 pm

carrotol wrote: Hi Arry! Been a while. What about 'scran' meaning eat? Isn't that mainly a Newcastle thing?
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:41 pm

It's funny now, going out with a girl that's lived in Moortown her entire life she regularly takes the mick out of my Armley dialect. You don't notice how thick it is until you hear it played back to you, I say.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.

jdbythesea
Posts: 405
Joined: Sat 02 Apr, 2011 6:14 am

Postby jdbythesea » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 8:41 pm

Phallica2000 wrote: stevief wrote: I think the expression 'to laik'is more predominant in Bradford than Leeds.I've worked with blokes from all over Yorkshire and dialects can vary from one town to the next.The first time I came across 'laik'was visiting an old mate who'd married a Bradford lass.When I called(not ca'l'ed)his wife told me he'd gone to watch city laik and I thought it was a place! I've never heard of this one before, is it in any specific areas of Leeds, do you know? I too often use laik to mean play. Back in the 70s (3 day week era) many Leeds factories - especially those in the tailoring and textile industries - were put on short time working or "laid off". Often you'd hear someone asking "are you working or laiking this week ?". It was used a lot in the Guiseley and Yeadon areas.JD
Johnny39
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Joined: Mon 11 Jun, 2007 3:54 pm

Postby Johnny39 » Mon 10 Sep, 2012 12:01 am

Phallica2000 wrote: drapesy wrote: Has anyone mentioned 'spice' for 'sweets' - or 'spanish' for 'licqourice'?? I always knew liquorice as 'Spanish', wonder where that came from? I think the reason it is called "Spanish" is because the liquorice plant originated in Spain. There has been a programme on BBC recently where Michael Portillo does a rail journey and he landed in Pontefract. He was in company with a local worthy who had been in the confectionary trade and I'm pretty sure this was his explanation for the "Spanish" name. I hope this helps.
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma?





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