Dialect/slang

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:13 pm

Si wrote: When I was a lad in Pudsey, "laik" was used all the time. "Is Paul laikin' out?" for example. I don't know if "calling" has anything to do with The Calls, as it is pronounced as in Tallin, with a short "ah" sound. Some others:'ey up - various meanings, from a greeting to "look out."Now then - a greeting.Summat - something.Give over - stop it.Daft 'a'peth - Silly person (daft half penny worth.)Snicket - a ginnel. Anyone know if these are interchangeable, or are there different definitions?Nesh - feels the cold.Fair thraiped - knackered.Jiggered - ditto (or broken/damaged.)Any more?Cheers Si I had a friend who used to call for me to play out when we were kids by saying "Is Lee dossin'?" to my parents when they answered the door to him.Ever heard that one before?
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:16 pm

FarnleyBloke wrote: Love the chippy ones, reminds me of the old joke..'I went in to a fish and chip shop and asked for fish and chips twice. The lady behind the counter said "I heard you the first time!"'Also although i say scraps i know alot of people that ask for bits.Someones already mentiond missen for myself. I always used to do this..hissen - his selfhersen - her selfussen - ourselvesmissen - myselfthissen - your selfPeg up - to give someone a lift (usually over a wall, not in a car)My mums favourite swear words were Sod and Get as in "come ere you little get!!"And when pestering her to find out what was for tea she either used to say "a walk round t'table and bite out t'leg" or "[edited for content] wi sugar on" Haha, you brought back many memories for me right there. Especially with '[edited for content] wi sugar on'...my Mum used to say the same!
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:17 pm

Brandy wrote: LOL wots for tea mam "[edited for content] wi sugar on" nice one farnleybloke, i used to get that one too. Lol. Same here.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:17 pm

rangieowner wrote: Anyone mentioned "an'all" meaning as well as in ' i'll ave once to eat now and a can o coke an'all ' Yep, I've said it for my entire life.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.

Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:19 pm

stevief wrote: slw wrote: gbdlufc wrote: HA did we have same mams........if it want bacon dip sarnie, or bread and dripping, it was always [edited for content] wi sugar on, brilliant. By the way is it a Leeds thing to always have Yorkshire puddings first then dinner, mi mam always did it and mi nanna did too, even I do now, dont half get some funny looks and comments. I agree, we 'ave a big pudding first and then a little 'un with the main Sunday dinner Local dietary preferences are as peculiar as accents.I was at my in-laws(from Belfast) one Christmas and offered a slice of seasonal cake.I asked for a piece of cheese as accompaniment and was stared at by everyone in the room.Eventually my request was granted with a thick slice of red Leicester. That's even weird to me and I'm from Armley...lol. What is this seasonal cake, like baked cake?
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:20 pm

rangieowner wrote: Si, you are correct! chav derives from the romany for child a 'chavi' or from the spanish 'charvo' meaning 'lad', more info here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chav Before the word 'charver' and then 'chav' became popular me and my friends new them simply as 'knobheads'.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:21 pm

Has anybody ever heard the insult 'bell-rash'?As in "He's a right bell-rash, he is."
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:22 pm

rangieowner wrote: magic wrote: rangieowner wrote: magic wrote: In Leeds 9:ladgin: embarrassingmush, gadge: same as charver i.e mate Gadge ain't a leeds word!! it ain't even english! It's derived from the Romany word gadj meaning outsider or foreigner!!!! Correct me if i am wrong but this thread was not tittled: Dialect/slang words originating from Leeds? Gadge is a word used by people of Leeds & many people i know. Well shoot me down!!!! being on a site about Leeds i just asumed that the LEEDS part might have some relevence!!! I use the word Gadj myself and have done for years and i also used Chav to mean child long before it became a 'fashionable' word meaning idiot!!! if this thread is not based around things actually from leeds then i ask admin to remove this entire thread! it has no place on a LEEDS website! Here here, I agree.These are words we people of Leeds used in our youth and beyond regardless of their origins.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.

Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:24 pm

Ian R P wrote: slw wrote: gbdlufc wrote: HA did we have same mams........if it want bacon dip sarnie, or bread and dripping, it was always [edited for content] wi sugar on, brilliant. By the way is it a Leeds thing to always have Yorkshire puddings first then dinner, mi mam always did it and mi nanna did too, even I do now, dont half get some funny looks and comments. I agree, we 'ave a big pudding first and then a little 'un with the main Sunday dinner Blimey, thats a bit too much pudding!We did used to have Yorkshires before sunday roast on a seperate plate, it's the only way to have em, lathered in gravy.I also love cheese with chrissy cake, it is a yorkshire thing too.I also have had funny looks off of southern mates for eating tongue sarnies and saying I'd eaten tripe and bread and dripping.Don't think i've ever had scrag ends or chitlings though! We always had 'em on the same plate as the rest of the food, but I recall when we had chicken or beef stew my sister would always line the edge of the plate with the pieces of meat and save them for last. Silly but amusing.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.
Phallica2000
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun 02 Sep, 2012 12:56 pm

Postby Phallica2000 » Sun 09 Sep, 2012 7:28 pm

gbdlufc wrote: Should have looked at Wiki first, what a gloit lol. I think what my dad was saying was that the kids had a form of it so the adults did not know what they were talking about?....Sorry. Apparently the origins are unknown...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_latinBut I'd have to say America for the origins, I've seen it on many shows etc. over the years.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.





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