Street names

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
j.c.d.
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Postby j.c.d. » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 6:24 pm

A. D. Young wrote:
Funny thing, with Alwoodley Park I remember once being told that the recreation ground on (or slightly off) The Avenue was the Alwoodley Park, though I suppose it could just as easily have been the original developer's name for the housing project on the land. I just don't know.

Similarly with the Primleys I suppose, but again I don't know. Does anyone?

With Alma Road, I hadn't thought of the Crimean War, for unlike clusters of street names elsewhere, there are in Headingley no accompanying Inkermans, Sevastopols and Balaclavas, while those other souvenirs of the war Raglan and Clarendon, are in Woodhouse, further in towards town. When originally built, they must have been right at the edge of the built-up area, as was the 1859 incarnation of the Grammar School on Moorland Road.

However, Cardigan Road, like Alma Road, is in splendid isolation from other Crimean subjects. I wonder why?

Is it possible Alma Road instead might have been named for the building developer's mother, wife or daughter?

But that still doesn't explain Blackman Lane, Crimbles Street and Wintoun Street

A. D. Young



In the 1940s i used to visit my Aunt who lived in the very bottom house on Blackman lane, Camp Road and other streets nearby had names with an Indian (Asian) connection and as it was a part of the Empire perhaps that is answer.
Cardiarms
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Postby Cardiarms » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 8:44 pm

A. D. Young wrote:


With Alma Road, I hadn't thought of the Crimean War, for unlike clusters of street names elsewhere, there are in Headingley no accompanying Inkermans, Sevastopols and Balaclavas, while those other souvenirs of the war Raglan and Clarendon, are in Woodhouse, further in towards town. When originally built, they must have been right at the edge of the built-up area, as was the 1859 incarnation of the Grammar School on Moorland Road.

However, Cardigan Road, like Alma Road, is in splendid isolation from other Crimean subjects. I wonder why?

Is it possible Alma Road instead might have been named for the building developer's mother, wife or daughter?


Alma road is named after the battle. It's a single road and wasn't part of a multiroad development. Cardigan road came much later after the failure of the zoological gardens. It was named after the former landowners, the brudenells who was also earl of cardigan. There are plenty of brudenells. I think the newports off cardigan road were the developers joke.
polo
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Postby polo » Thu 24 Apr, 2014 7:51 pm

Any thoughts on Model Road ?
stevief
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Postby stevief » Sat 03 May, 2014 7:22 pm

A. D. Young wrote:
Funny thing, with Alwoodley Park I remember once being told that the recreation ground on (or slightly off) The Avenue was the Alwoodley Park, though I suppose it could just as easily have been the original developer's name for the housing project on the land. I just don't know.

Similarly with the Primleys I suppose, but again I don't know. Does anyone?

With Alma Road, I hadn't thought of the Crimean War, for unlike clusters of street names elsewhere, there are in Headingley no accompanying Inkermans, Sevastopols and Balaclavas, while those other souvenirs of the war Raglan and Clarendon, are in Woodhouse, further in towards town. When originally built, they must have been right at the edge of the built-up area, as was the 1859 incarnation of the Grammar School on Moorland Road.

However, Cardigan Road, like Alma Road, is in splendid isolation from other Crimean subjects. I wonder why?

Is it possible Alma Road instead might have been named for the building developer's mother, wife or daughter?

But that still doesn't explain Blackman Lane, Crimbles Street and Wintoun Street

A. D. Young

Cardigan Road is only in isolation these days because of slum clearances in the late 60s/early 70s
There were many Cardigan streets along with Evanstons in the area now occupied by McDonalds and the soon-to-be-opened Aldi,the streets continued all the way to the river.Also Cardigan Lane,which is now a cul-de-sac,continued to Burley Road before the school playground was extended.

polo
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Postby polo » Mon 05 May, 2014 5:39 am

arry awk wrote:
simonm wrote:
I grew up on a street called Poplar way.. Nowt really unusual I suppose. Just that there isn't 1 single poplar on that street... Regular Smiley

Hi Simonm
I think your Poplar Way was one of the Leeds streets named after
certain London districts, like Euston L11, Eltham L6, Edgeware
L8, Bayswater L8. There are lots more. Even Little London!!



Hi there i currently live on poplar court and have been looking into this one. It actually relates to poplar farm.
So im guessing there will have been poplars there at some time.
You can still see the remains of the old farm building off henconner lane


http://goo.gl/maps/jzNZZ
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Carona
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Postby Carona » Wed 18 Jun, 2014 5:05 pm

stevief wrote:
There's a 'Whack House Lane' in Yeadon.Could it be as cruel as it sounds?



I read somewhere that Canada Road in Rawdon was built by a group of people who got together and built the long row of houses. In an old 1898 dictionary the meaning of whack is "share" so maybe the building of the houses on Whack House Lane was a shared venture as was Canada Road?    
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Steve Jones
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Postby Steve Jones » Wed 18 Jun, 2014 7:15 pm

Carona wrote:
stevief wrote:
There's a 'Whack House Lane' in Yeadon.Could it be as cruel as it sounds?



I read somewhere that Canada Road in Rawdon was built by a group of people who got together and built the long row of houses. In an old 1898 dictionary the meaning of whack is "share" so maybe the building of the houses on Whack House Lane was a shared venture as was Canada Road?    



Yes ,a meaning of whack means a share in an enterprise as in the phrase "A fair whack"thanks for mentioning this Carona it is an interesting explanation that makes sense.
Steve Jones
I don't know everything, I just like to give that impression!
Magpie
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Re: Street names

Postby Magpie » Thu 30 Oct, 2014 3:24 pm

Hi!
Having read some of posts here, I'm impressed with the knowledge you guys have about the origins of street names. Now, having got the boot-licking out of the way, I wonder if anyone can shed light on the origin of the naming of the Mayvilles in LS6? I was born on Mayville Road and while I'm very much aware of the origin of the Cardigans and Brudenells, I have no idea what the significance is to the name Mayville as it applies to Leeds.
Thanks, folks!

SteamKaos
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Re: Street names

Postby SteamKaos » Tue 14 Apr, 2015 1:31 pm

Bettylogg between Swillington and little Preston. Always thought it a weird name. However records show an Elizabeth Logg lived there at the end of the 18th century. Mystery solved. Go a bit futher up and you come to another weird name. Cuddy Cross or Goody Cross (depending on your age!). A lot of local people used to say it was from a woman who lived there called Cross - hence Goodwife Cross. However, referenced again in the Swillington parish Records for the 16th Century as Holy Cross otherwise known as Goody Cross. It is a T-Junction now. Was it a crossroads once? Was there a cross there and if so why? Still mysteries to solve.
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blackprince
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Re: Street names

Postby blackprince » Mon 13 Jul, 2015 7:32 pm

I grew up knowing a lot Leeds streets named after people. They were just street names to me and I neither knew nor cared a jot about some long dead Victorian or Edwardian worthy who had been honoured in this way.
Once in a while I come across a reference to one of these personages and realise that’s why it was called “such and such” street.
Recently, I came across this extract in a biography of Winston Churchill:-
“—a fairly obscure Tory MP, Ernest Beckett, a member of the Yorkshire post-owning Leeds banking family, who had moved out to the broad acres of the East & North Ridings . Beckett, an uncle of the first Mrs Anthony Eden, sat for Whitby for 20 years before becoming Lord Grimethorpe.”
So that explains Beckett Street. Nothing to do with the murdered archbishop of Canterbury!
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!

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