Street names

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
Leodian
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JoinedCOLON Thu 10 Jun, 2010 8:03 am

Postby Leodian » Mon 21 Apr, 2014 1:22 pm

jim wrote:
I think in this case (Whack House) I'll go for "old" as in "ex" - parrot like!


Regular Smiley

Sorry to go well off-topic but I thought I would post this part of the script of the hilarious Monty Python's 'Dead Parrot' sketch:-

"Mr. Praline: I wish to complain about this parrot what I purchased not half an hour ago from this very boutique.

Owner: Oh yes, the, uh, the Norwegian Blue...What's, uh...What's wrong with it?

Mr. Praline: I'll tell you what's wrong with it, my lad. 'E's dead, that's what's wrong with it!

Owner: No, no, 'e's uh,...he's resting.

Mr. Praline: Look, matey, I know a dead parrot when I see one, and I'm looking at one right now.

Owner: No no he's not dead, he's, he's restin'! Remarkable bird, the Norwegian Blue, in'it, ay? Beautiful plumage!

Mr. Praline: The plumage don't enter into it. It's stone dead."

There's more of this brilliant verbal and visual sketch. Regular Smiley


A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
Lilysmum
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JoinedCOLON Fri 28 Mar, 2008 12:31 pm

Postby Lilysmum » Mon 21 Apr, 2014 2:18 pm

Leodian wrote:
stevief wrote:
There's a 'Whack House Lane' in Yeadon.Could it be as cruel as it sounds?


stevief mentions Whack House Lane in the post dated 25-Sep-2007 on page 2 of this thread. While looking for something unrelated today I happened to come across Old Whack House Lane and I then also found Whack House Lane (both in Yeadon) on looking at a Google map. Whack House is a great name. I've tried to find information if there is/was a Whack House but I've not been readily able to find anything (even in Leodis). I wonder if anyone knows anything of a Whack House, or at least why there is such a name as it sounds like there should be some history behind it!

Whack House lane runs from Kirk Lane down to the A65 (near wesfield fish shop) and may have been a continuation of Old Whack house lane before the A65 existed. Old Whack house lane is acessed by going up Westfield ave at the side of the fish shop and taking a right turn, there are new (ish) houses on there. So the end of New is more or less opposite where the end of Old would have been with the A65 running between.    
polo
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JoinedCOLON Mon 20 Feb, 2012 11:32 am

Postby polo » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 4:28 am

Model Road Armley ? any ideas on this one
A. D. Young
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JoinedCOLON Sun 08 Dec, 2013 12:41 am

Postby A. D. Young » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 9:44 am

I lived in the Primley Parks in Alwoodley for the first quarter-century of my life and to this day have relatives and friends living there. But who or what was Primley, and where is the park?

And who was the Blackman of Blackman Lane, or the Alma of Alma Road?

For that matter, who or what was the Crimbles commemorated in Crimbles Street or the Byron of Byron Street (both off North Street).

I ask, not having the answers myself.

A. D. Young

somme1916
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JoinedCOLON Fri 02 Mar, 2012 7:39 pm

Postby somme1916 » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 10:02 am

As a kid I was always fascinated by the Bismarck,Disraeli,Mafeking named streets of Leeds 11 as they always evoked images of war and far off places.Many streets were,of course,named after military campaigns and royal/political figures.Victoria this,Albert that, Coronation the other etc etc There are some really obscure street names around.Then,of course,the more humorous ones come to mind.I'm sure we all know several of these....I'll let you use your imagination,for fear of a lambasting from current residents ! Wink    
        
I'm not just anybody,I am sommebody !
drapesy
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JoinedCOLON Sat 24 Feb, 2007 4:50 pm

Postby drapesy » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 10:29 am

Alma - also a pub name - was the name of the first battle in the Crimean war, named after the River Alma.
I heard it said that 'Whackhouse' is a corruption of 'Workhouse', but whether that's true or not who knows?
there are 10 types of people in the world. Those that understand ternary, those that don't and those that think this a joke about the binary system.

Johnny39
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JoinedCOLON Mon 11 Jun, 2007 3:54 pm

Postby Johnny39 » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 4:50 pm

A. D. Young wrote:
I lived in the Primley Parks in Alwoodley for the first quarter-century of my life and to this day have relatives and friends living there. But who or what was Primley, and where is the park?

And who was the Blackman of Blackman Lane, or the Alma of Alma Road?

For that matter, who or what was the Crimbles commemorated in Crimbles Street or the Byron of Byron Street (both off North Street).

I ask, not having the answers myself.

A. D. Young


A.D. I lived in Alwoodley, just off The Avenue, with my parents I might add, from the middle 50's. This, like Primley Park, was also known as Alwoodley Park. Never knew why it was called "Park", or if it is today? Could be an historical thing I suppose.
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma?
jim
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JoinedCOLON Sun 17 May, 2009 10:09 am

Postby jim » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 5:01 pm

Were they perhaps Hall estates which were sold for developement?

A. D. Young
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JoinedCOLON Sun 08 Dec, 2013 12:41 am

Postby A. D. Young » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 5:23 pm

Funny thing, with Alwoodley Park I remember once being told that the recreation ground on (or slightly off) The Avenue was the Alwoodley Park, though I suppose it could just as easily have been the original developer's name for the housing project on the land. I just don't know.

Similarly with the Primleys I suppose, but again I don't know. Does anyone?

With Alma Road, I hadn't thought of the Crimean War, for unlike clusters of street names elsewhere, there are in Headingley no accompanying Inkermans, Sevastopols and Balaclavas, while those other souvenirs of the war Raglan and Clarendon, are in Woodhouse, further in towards town. When originally built, they must have been right at the edge of the built-up area, as was the 1859 incarnation of the Grammar School on Moorland Road.

However, Cardigan Road, like Alma Road, is in splendid isolation from other Crimean subjects. I wonder why?

Is it possible Alma Road instead might have been named for the building developer's mother, wife or daughter?

But that still doesn't explain Blackman Lane, Crimbles Street and Wintoun Street

A. D. Young
Bruno
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JoinedCOLON Fri 29 Jul, 2011 9:54 am

Postby Bruno » Wed 23 Apr, 2014 6:02 pm

Here's a bit of information (rather heavy going I'm afraid) that might go some way towards explaining the origin of Crimbles Street:

LONSDALE HUNDRED 167

1212 LI, de Crumbles a 1265 CO. Gt. and Li. Crimbles are both S. of the Cocker,
but formerly part of Crimbles was N. of the river.

This name is common, especially as a field-name. Cf. e.g., Crimble (Heap,
Bury), Crymyll (Worston) 1518 CCR, and see VHL III. 430, IV. 399. Goodall
mentions several examples of Crimbles from Yks. Crymel (Cornw.) is found
OR I. 203, Crumble, Suss. HR II. 205. This name must represent a native
common noun, apparently an O.E. *crymel or the like. This may be a derivative
of cruma " small piece, scrap," the meaning being " a small piece of land " ; this
is corroborated by the fact that the name often has the plural form. 1 Similar
names are : Scrapps (a small piece of land in Aspull) 1501 CC (cf. scrap " a
small piece "), the Croats, Glo. (cf. M.E. crote " small piece "). For names of
similar meaning in Sweden see Liden, NoB IV. 106ff.


Above information extracted from here:

http://tinyurl.com/losxjkz
The older I get, the better I was.

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