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PostedCOLON Sun 26 Dec, 2010 6:04 pm
by LS13
I believe this has been asked before in a thread on odd Yorkshire sayings but don't think it was ever answered. Who were Dick and Liddy? Its a saying I've heard numerous times referring to a couple who seem happy/ comfortable in each others company eg 'Look at them two sat there like Dick and Liddy'.
It could be peculiar to Leeds and seems particularly well known in Kirkstall/Bramley areas. Google searches don't seem to bring anything conclusive up, but I'm sure someone on here will have an idea?

PostedCOLON Sun 26 Dec, 2010 7:33 pm
by raveydavey
Not Leeds, but I'm fairly sure there is a monthly "Dick and Liddy's Comedy Night" at the Victoria Theatre in Halifax.

I've not heard the expression before so it hadn't meant anything to me previously.

PostedCOLON Sun 26 Dec, 2010 8:11 pm
by Johnny39
"Dick & Liddy" is an expression I have been familiar with all my life. It was used by my mother to describe any two persons, even animals, who were inseparable. I heard her use the term to other people and they seemed to know what she meant, so it must have been a well known expression around Leeds. It would be interesting all the same to know its origins.

PostedCOLON Sun 26 Dec, 2010 9:23 pm
by BLAKEY
Just a vague possiblity - I wonder if there was a devoted couple of note somewhere locally long ago by the proper names of Richard and Lydia ??

PostedCOLON Sun 26 Dec, 2010 10:48 pm
by keyholekate
I always thought that Dick and Liddy referred to two partners in crime as in The Watergate Scandal in the 70's. As in G. Gordon Liddy and Richard M. Nixon's crimes that led to his resignation.I am not sure though but remember my mother calling my brother and his pal that.

PostedCOLON Sun 26 Dec, 2010 11:37 pm
by morleyhall
raveydavey wrote:
Not Leeds, but I'm fairly sure there is a monthly "Dick and Liddy's Comedy Night" at the Victoria Theatre in Halifax.

I've not heard the expression before so it hadn't meant anything to me previously.


I think you could be onto something with comedy. Perhaps they were a long forgetten comedy double act.

Most of the stuff I looked at on Google suggested Yorkshire origins, but I've heard it used in Lancashire aswell.


PostedCOLON Mon 27 Dec, 2010 1:24 am
by LS1
Something similar to Darby and Joan perhaps?

PostedCOLON Tue 28 Dec, 2010 12:16 am
by Steve Jones
2 comments I found on internet threads by Googling ,suggested 1. a 1940's radio show characters or 2. an old music hall act.
The latter seemed more likely although I haven't found anything regarding it.I did find out that the old music hall star Nellie Wallace was actually Eleanor Liddy, as she married someone called Liddy (it is an Irish name apparently) but I haven't found a biography of her on the net giving details of her husband, so don't know whether this was a co-incidence or not.

PostedCOLON Tue 28 Dec, 2010 1:58 am
by dogduke
Its a very friendly term which I have known for donkey's
yonks.It must go back back goodness knows how long.
I feel that it is a truly honest Leeds/Yorkshire thing.
Mi Mam is nearly 91 now - will check out her 'memory bank'
later this week and report back.

PostedCOLON Thu 30 Dec, 2010 2:07 pm
by LS13
keyholekate wrote:
I always thought that Dick and Liddy referred to two partners in crime as in The Watergate Scandal in the 70's. As in G. Gordon Liddy and Richard M. Nixon's crimes that led to his resignation.I am not sure though but remember my mother calling my brother and his pal that.


Thats an interesting theory that I havent heard before. However anecdotal evidence does suggest Dick and Liddy was in use before the 70's. If thats the case, its strange how another 'Dick and Liddy' came to be partners in crime given the relatively unusual names!