Scott Hall

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
The Parksider
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Postby The Parksider » Sat 04 Dec, 2010 3:17 pm

Leodian wrote:
I see the property has been reduced in price for a quick sale!

I like the note "The property has sustained some fire damage and is in need of renovation to return it to its former glory...Please note the access to the property is difficult and we would recommend that you wear hard hats, bring a torch and wear suitable footwear...PLEASE NOTE: THE PROPERTY OFTEN HAS GUARD DOGS ROAMING FREE ON THE LAND FOR SECURITY". Regular Smiley


Exactly!!! The scene from years ago is a lovely setting, now it's a lot less than lovely and clearly the haunt of rougues and vagabonds (and seemingly twisted firestarters).

The House itself is wonderful.
MaidenLUFC
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Postby MaidenLUFC » Mon 20 Dec, 2010 9:38 pm

The Parksider wrote:

It's beautiful old house but would anyone live in the middle of a wood in the middle of an industrial wasteland.......



Someone will buy it and convert it into Student flats....
Leeds Hippo
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Postby Leeds Hippo » Tue 21 Dec, 2010 1:25 pm

On a similiar topic ....

Anyone know where Whitehall Road gets it's name from. This was originally called the Halifax New Road (Turnpike) but I'm curious about where the "Whitehall" is located.
patrickj
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Re: Scott Hall

Postby patrickj » Sun 15 Mar, 2015 5:34 pm

If that building was Scott Hall (albeit in Buslingthorpe) what was the one next to the roundabout at the junction of Potternewton Lane and Scott Hall road (demolished circa 2005)?

patrickj
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Re: Scott Hall.

Postby patrickj » Sun 15 Mar, 2015 5:44 pm

dogduke wroteColonThis seems to be the bestleodis can offer.http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?reso ... Y=FULLOpen archives compliant siteSupported by BIG Lottery FundScott Hall, Scott Hall Street    Scott Hall, Scott Hall StreetDescription:25th November 1948. View shows the front of Scott Hall, a large mid eighteenth century house, built in brown hand-made bricks, with an outbuilding on the left. This is a rare example of the type of plain house built by Leeds merchants during that period and it is now Grade II listed. The central entrance was altered in the twentieth century. The property is located off Scott Hall Street but the original Scott Hall was sited in Potternewton, south of Potternewton Lane near where Scott Hall Place is now. This had been the home of the Scott family with ancestral roots in Scotland. Gilbert Scott, who died in 1542 was Lord of the Manor of Potternewton. The last of the line was William Scott, a farmer. After he died the Hall was demolished and extensive quarrying was carried out on the site. The stone was used to construct many Leeds buildings. When the quarries were worked out, they were filled in and a large part of the area is now the Prince Philip Playing Fields. When the A61 road was laid through in the 1930s, it was named Scott Hall Road as a reminder of the former land use. The Scott Hall in the photograph is still standing and has recently been for advertised for sale.
jim
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Re: Scott Hall

Postby jim » Sun 15 Mar, 2015 6:28 pm

I don't know if original poster Leeds Hippo is still about, but in answer to the query "Where is White Hall located", it was the end point of the Leeds - Halifax Turnpike at the Hipperholme junction with the Bradford - Brighouse road. There is still a Whitehall Inn at the site, but I have no idea if it is, or contains remnants of, the original.
LS1
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Re: Scott Hall

Postby LS1 » Mon 16 Mar, 2015 8:58 am

patrickj wroteColonIf that building was Scott Hall (albeit in Buslingthorpe) what was the one next to the roundabout at the junction of Potternewton Lane and Scott Hall road (demolished circa 2005)?


Think that is Rutland House.
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cnosni
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Re: Scott Hall.

Postby cnosni » Wed 18 Mar, 2015 7:08 pm

patrickj wroteColon
dogduke wroteColonThis seems to be the bestleodis can offer.http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?reso ... Y=FULLOpen archives compliant siteSupported by BIG Lottery FundScott Hall, Scott Hall Street    Scott Hall, Scott Hall StreetDescription:25th November 1948. View shows the front of Scott Hall, a large mid eighteenth century house, built in brown hand-made bricks, with an outbuilding on the left. This is a rare example of the type of plain house built by Leeds merchants during that period and it is now Grade II listed. The central entrance was altered in the twentieth century. The property is located off Scott Hall Street but the original Scott Hall was sited in Potternewton, south of Potternewton Lane near where Scott Hall Place is now. This had been the home of the Scott family with ancestral roots in Scotland. Gilbert Scott, who died in 1542 was Lord of the Manor of Potternewton. The last of the line was William Scott, a farmer. After he died the Hall was demolished and extensive quarrying was carried out on the site. The stone was used to construct many Leeds buildings. When the quarries were worked out, they were filled in and a large part of the area is now the Prince Philip Playing Fields. When the A61 road was laid through in the 1930s, it was named Scott Hall Road as a reminder of the former land use. The Scott Hall in the photograph is still standing and has recently been for advertised for sale.

Very similar looking to Dial House in Halton
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mark1978
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Re: Scott Hall

Postby mark1978 » Thu 26 Nov, 2015 1:04 am

The original Scott Hall stood approximately where the Scott Hall Church building now is on Scott Hall Grove. It apparently dates back to the 12th century and was indeed the home of the Scott family. There's some info in an 1876 book of their family history transcribed here: https://archive.org/stream/memorialsoff ... t_djvu.txt - search for "potter newton" and in particular note this bit:

At Potter Newton, in the township of Leeds, in Yorkshire, existed in early
Norman times a manorial residence termed Scotty's Hall. Here dwelt a family of the
name of le Scot, the first of whom was John le Scot, steward of the Empress Maud,
mother of King Henry II. of England. The empress was closely connected by ties of
relationship with the Earls of Chester, one of whom, Ranulph de Blandeville (uncle
of John le Scot, and, on his death. Earl of Chester), possessed this lordship, as will
shortly be shown. She was likewise niece of David I., King of Scotland, John le
Scot's great-grandfather.'"' Thus, there can be little doubt that this family at Potter
Newton was also connected by ties of relationship with that of John le Scot, the Earl
Palatine of Chester, through whom the Kentish family derive their surname. The
Potter Newton family of le Scot were considerable benefactors to the neighbouring
priories of Kirklees and Kirkstall, one of the earlier charters of the latter {circa a.d.
1 142) being conferred by a member of this family. It is not improbable that William
le Scot, of Potter Newton, and William de Schoies or le Scot, the pre-Domesday pro-
prietor- of lands in Suffolk, may have been of the same family, as both are stated to have
been great benefactors of the Abbeys of St. Mary and St. Peter, in the city of York.
Be this as it may, on the death of Ranulph de Blandeville, Earl of Chester, and on the
division of his inheritance, the township of Leeds did not descend to John le Scot,
the succeeding Earl of Chester, but to his other nephew, an Albini, ancestor of the
Earls of Arundel.


It's apparently mentioned in Ralph Thoresby's diaries, which suggests it survived till the early 18thC, although of course it may have been rebuilt in the interim. The 1847 map (http://maps.nls.uk/view/102344914) notes the sign of the old hall, and has a newer Scott Hall (Farm?) on more or less the same spot.

It appears that after the old hall was demolished the whole area was quarried to buggery (as we archaeologists like to say) and subsequently landscaped, so I suppose it's doubtful that there's any trace left of the original hall.
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mhoulden
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Re: Scott Hall

Postby mhoulden » Thu 26 Nov, 2015 2:09 am

Back on the market again, but it looks like they've done some work on it: http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for ... 98888.html

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