Leodis/Loidis

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
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cnosni
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Postby cnosni » Wed 09 Sep, 2009 2:52 pm

Cant find anything like Leeds or Holbeck on the continent.

Anyone else had a go?
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Postby Si » Wed 09 Sep, 2009 3:53 pm

Trojan wrote:
Briggy wrote:
Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:

"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derived
from the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bede
from the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others suppose
i t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is a
town called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,
near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—
Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so called
from leading to a beck or stream where those animals were
washed."



There are Briggates and Kirkgates in many northern towns though, there's a Briggate in Bradford and there's certainly a Kirkgate in Wakey. There's a village called Holbeck in Notts - on the road from the M1 (jct 30) to Newark. I must admit I've never seen another Swinegate. Ponte has a "Beastfair" though

    

There's a Kirkgate in Otley, and also a Hol Beck just east of the town, which flows off the Chevin under Leeds Road.
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Postby Briggy » Wed 09 Sep, 2009 5:29 pm

cnosni wrote:
Cant find anything like Leeds or Holbeck on the continent.

Anyone else had a go?



I wonder if this could be it:

http://www.imca-slotracing.com/SS1.htm

The three waterways mentioned flow into the Dender I think.

That said, I can't say that I'm persuaded that Lede is the source of our fair city's name.

And just out of interest how the David Henry does anyone manage to get Leeds from "cair hid colt"?
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cnosni
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Postby cnosni » Wed 09 Sep, 2009 8:30 pm

Briggy wrote:
cnosni wrote:
Cant find anything like Leeds or Holbeck on the continent.

Anyone else had a go?



I wonder if this could be it:

http://www.imca-slotracing.com/SS1.htm

The three waterways mentioned flow into the Dender I think.

That said, I can't say that I'm persuaded that Lede is the source of our fair city's name.

And just out of interest how the David Henry does anyone manage to get Leeds from "cair hid colt"?


Well found!
That would seem to be the reference,but like you id say no.

If Leeds was called "Leed" then id be a little more inclined to take it seriously.

The "S" is the key here,it appears in Loidis and Leodis.
Having done family history i know how words ,especially in the older times,can be slightly mispelt,either through poor spelling or mishearing and therefore innacurate transcription.

The one letter that doesnt seem to suffer in Parish Registers,wills etc is the sound in a name or word produced by the letter "s",it is very very rarely ommited in the written form.

cair hid colt doesnt hold much either to me.

However,id like to find the origins of Leodis,ie the written original form.

Loidis is what Bede came up with,but where does Leodis,clearly a derivative of Loidis,get its first written mention?    
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Postby Trojan » Wed 09 Sep, 2009 9:56 pm

cnosni wrote:
Cant find anything like Leeds or Holbeck on the continent.

Anyone else had a go?

There's a place called Tingley in in Denmark.
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cnosni
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Postby cnosni » Thu 10 Sep, 2009 12:39 am

Trojan wrote:
cnosni wrote:
Cant find anything like Leeds or Holbeck on the continent.

Anyone else had a go?

There's a place called Tingley in in Denmark.


That would make sense as the earliest Viking settlers to the area thought the Leeds area to be a bit of a quogmire and decided to move away from the Aire valley and founded Tinglae.

Thats the legend,has anyone got the historical fact?

    
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Postby drapesy » Fri 11 Sep, 2009 12:46 am

Briggy wrote:
Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:

"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derived
from the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bede
from the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others suppose
i t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is a
town called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,
near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—
Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so called
from leading to a beck or stream where those animals were
washed."

'Gate' means street or lane - so Briggate means Bridge Street and Kirkgate means Church Street - not "the Bridgegate' or 'the Churchgate'








there are 10 types of people in the world. Those that understand ternary, those that don't and those that think this a joke about the binary system.

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cnosni
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Postby cnosni » Fri 11 Sep, 2009 10:26 am

drapesy wrote:
Briggy wrote:
Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:

"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derived
from the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bede
from the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others suppose
i t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is a
town called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,
near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—
Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so called
from leading to a beck or stream where those animals were
washed."

'Gate' means street or lane - so Briggate means Bridge Street and Kirkgate means Church Street - not "the Bridgegate' or 'the Churchgate'









Speak up then Drapesy!!
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Postby Si » Fri 11 Sep, 2009 10:42 am

drapesy wrote:
Briggy wrote:
Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:

"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derived
from the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bede
from the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others suppose
i t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is a
town called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,
near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—
Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so called
from leading to a beck or stream where those animals were
washed."

'Gate' means street or lane - so Briggate means Bridge Street and Kirkgate means Church Street - not "the Bridgegate' or 'the Churchgate'









Hi Drapesy. Been on holiday?

If "gate" means "street" in olden times, what does "street" mean? (As in Watling Street, etc?)
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cnosni
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Postby cnosni » Fri 11 Sep, 2009 3:19 pm

Si wrote:
drapesy wrote:
Briggy wrote:
Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:

"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derived
from the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bede
from the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others suppose
i t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is a
town called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,
near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—
Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so called
from leading to a beck or stream where those animals were
washed."

'Gate' means street or lane - so Briggate means Bridge Street and Kirkgate means Church Street - not "the Bridgegate' or 'the Churchgate'









Hi Drapesy. Been on holiday?

If "gate" means "street" in olden times, what does "street" mean? (As in Watling Street, etc?)

Strata is a Roman term mate,street being the modern derivative.

Gate comes from Gata,the Norse equivalent
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/cnosni/
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