Railway Relics of Yesteryear

Railways, trams, buses, etc.
jim
Posts: 1834
Joined: Sun 17 May, 2009 10:09 am

Postby jim » Fri 17 Sep, 2010 9:59 pm

Checking with the Godfrey Edition Holbeck and Wortley 1906 OS sheets numbers 1and 3 appear to be situated just inside the L&NWR/LMS goods yard.
danny
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Joined: Sat 11 Sep, 2010 5:41 am

Postby danny » Fri 17 Sep, 2010 10:01 pm

right on Jim, the build date and the original purpose they were built for is what is intriguing me, and I need to reply to some comments made by some other user on Leodis cheers Danny
jim
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Postby jim » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 12:22 am

Hello again Danny. These cottages appear on the 1850 OS map. ( see old-maps.co.uk, co-ordinates 428300, 432650. ) As the Leeds Dewsbury and Manchester Railway - Acts of June 1845, July 1846, amalgamated with the L&NWR July 1847 - opened to traffic in September 1848, I reckon that they were built new along with the railway.Hope this helps.    
dogduke
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Postby dogduke » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 12:41 am

Phill_dvsn wrote: Just thought i'd let you know there is a nice collection of archive railway shots around Copley Hill, maps e.t.c herehttp://snipurl.com/141in0It may, or may not answer any questions. But it's worth taking a look for the steam, soot, and unfittedclanky waggons of yesteryear alone. Enjoy      Don't know if it anyone has explained 'unfitted' a word that probably only exists in railway terminolgy.Its a railway vehicle without a 'continuous' brake',a brake mechanismwhich applies to the whole train.All trains today are air braked - early vehicles were vacuum braked,all connected by brake pipes throughout the train and operated by the driver.'Fitted' vehicles had the letters 'XP'stencilled on the side.XP meaning that they could be coupled if needed to a passenger train.As well as having the vacuum brake 'fitted' they also needed to have a minimum wheelbase of I think 12 feet.After dieselisation 'fitted heads' were introduced,diesels not having the braking power of steam locos.Fitted wagons were shunted out to form the fitted head,the greater the brake power the heavier load you could shift.Freight trains varied from class 6,fully fitted,class 7* a good proportionof fiitted vehicles,class 7,class 8 and class 9(no fitted wagons)All loadingswere calculated according to weight,brake force andloco capability and the requirements of the route including an overall length limit accordng to the loops,goods lines and sidings where the the train could be 'put away'to allow higher classed trains to pass.
Consciousness: That annoying time between naps.90% of being smart is knowing what you're dumb at.

jim
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Postby jim » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 12:47 am

And here was me thinking the word was created for politicians............    
dogduke
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Postby dogduke » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 1:29 am

jim wrote: And here was me thinking the word was created for politicians............     I can see your point there Jim - politics and railways were more'fit for purpose'than today.There is no place for rusty old boxes on wheels and rusty old plonkers on HP/Lords benches.
Consciousness: That annoying time between naps.90% of being smart is knowing what you're dumb at.
Phill_dvsn
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Postby Phill_dvsn » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 1:47 am

If your interested in unfitted waggons, and goods trains of yesteryear Dogduke, then my mate Arnie a.k.a 'The Deadmans Handle' has a rather nice set of brake van shots, and stories from his time at Guide Bridge in the 70's and 80's herehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/deadmans_handle/s ... 14/detail/    The set includes T30 the supposed 'armoured brake van'for it's local trips around the notorious snipers alley around South Manchester lol     
My flickr pictures are herehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
jim
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Joined: Sun 17 May, 2009 10:09 am

Postby jim » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 2:34 am

Danny, thinking of your question about what were the cottages built for, after a bit of thought ( no sources, I'm afraid ) I have come to the conclusions that firstly, if they were built at the same time as the railway there would be a planned purpose for them, and secondly that although "cottages" is a reasonable description for them, they have too many elegant design features for them to have been provided for porters, shunters, or other working class people at that period in time. I would suggest that they would be for lower management posts, grades that it would be advantageous to have living "on the job" so to speak. In that event such people would have a twenty-four hour security function. I am thinking of the posts of Goods Agent, Yard Foreman, Chief Clerk, Policeman or suchlike.To support my idea that the cottages were contemporary with the opening of the railway, note how the Copley Hill side wall of the cottages is an upward extension of the boundary wall with no apparent join-line. The wall itself acts as support to the made-up ground of the yard and as wing wall to the bridge.These were needed to allow the railway to cross the road at a height to allow vehicles to pass beneath. It also allowed the railway to gradually gain enough elevation to join the other railways at Three Signal Bridge Junction to enter Leeds Central Station, which was,of course, the lines first terminus    

The Parksider
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Postby The Parksider » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 5:53 pm

jim wrote: Danny, thinking of your question about what were the cottages built for.........I would suggest that they would be for lower management posts, grades that it would be advantageous to have living "on the job" Opposite Tetleys on crown point road is a fairly grand house (Not chadwick house) that may have been for a company manager to be near work. Down along clarence road is/was another stand alone quality house that again looks like it could be for the manager (of the docks maybe). I am sure there are other exapmples of trudging through industrial areas only to find a nice house stood entirely on it's own. In more modern "commuting" times they seem to have morphed into offices and storage buildings.
The Parksider
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Postby The Parksider » Sat 18 Sep, 2010 6:00 pm

jim wrote: I would suggest that they would be for lower management posts Possibly another on Goodman St opposite Atkinson Street.





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