Oldest Grave

Houses, churches, monuments, graves, etc.
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Steve Jones
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Postby Steve Jones » Thu 30 Jul, 2009 1:00 am

Here is a reference to 15th century tombs in situ in Harewood:

Harewood Church stands about half a mile west of the village, and is a venerable structure, dedicated to the Holy Cross (in olden time the Holy Rood), embowered on all sides by glorious woodland; seen from the park it forms a picture whose charm of contrast and holy sweetness would require the pencil of a Claude and the pen of a Ruskin to delineate. Graceful beech, whose umbrageous branches form a shady bower across the woodland path, “where joyous birds, hid “under greenwood shade, sing merry notes on every branch and bough.” Whilst the tower, appearing under a circle of sweeping trees, cannot fail to impress the beholder with its beauty and the loveliness of its surroundings.
The present edifice dates from the 13th century. In the time of the 2nd Edward, the Scots penetrated into this neighbourhood, leaving ruin and devastation in their track. In this furious raid the churches of Harewood and Adel were greatly damaged. At the village of Pannal, the Scots encamped and burned the church to the ground. Of the original church, built soon after the Conquest, by William de Curci, nearly all traces have disappeared. The interior is most interesting to the antiquary, with its altar tombs of white marble, on which repose the recumbent effigies of former owners of Harewood.
First Tomb—Sir Richard Redman and his wife
Elizabeth.    Second Tomb—Sir William Rytber and
Sybil his wife. Third Tomb-—Sir John Neville and his
wife, 1482. Fourth Tomb, under the south arch—Sir Richard Franks and his wife, of Alwoodly Hall. Fifth
Tomb—Sir Richard Redman and his wife Elizabeth,
Grandson of Sir Richard, whose tomb is numbered
1. Sixth Tomb—Sir William Gascoigne and his wife Elizabeth, of Gawthorpe Hall, the immortal Lord Chief Justice of England, in 1419.
Besides there are many other mural tablets, old grave-stones, &c., including an
elegant monument to Sir Thomas Dennison, and the Harewood vault.




Steve Jones
I don't know everything, I just like to give that impression!
Catweazle
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Postby Catweazle » Fri 31 Jul, 2009 7:22 pm



I have seen references to gravestones only really coming in after the reformation so given Wikipedia says that 1648 you did really well there.




Defintely around 1620s (incidentally if anyone's in Bradfield the stone in question and a few almost as old is about halfway along the path between the gate and the church door).

1648 was the END of the Reformation so depending how the wikipedia entry is read "after the Reformation" could mean after the START of the Reformation which gives us another couple of centuries to play with in certain areas of Europe anyway. And even in England Henry VIII was bringing it on in the mid-16th century...    
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Steve Jones
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Postby Steve Jones » Fri 31 Jul, 2009 7:39 pm

Well i wouldn't rely on Wikipedia as a source of knowledge given that it can be edited by anyone.We have both roman,saxon,viking and celtic tombstones known in the UK so whoever write this didn't do much research or else meant the traditional style of tombstone and was still wrong<G>.
Steve Jones
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STICKS
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Postby STICKS » Tue 21 Sep, 2010 10:43 pm

If anyone is looking for very old graves they would be very interested in taking a walk round Becket Street cemetery opposite St James hospital , particular on a nice crisp sunny day ,i have seen graves in there going back to 1500s ,and if your lucky you might see a very large owl good hunting .

Cardiarms
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Postby Cardiarms » Tue 21 Sep, 2010 10:53 pm

I thought it didn't open until the 1850's? Was there something there before?
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chameleon
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Postby chameleon » Tue 21 Sep, 2010 11:18 pm

Cardiarms wrote:
I thought it didn't open until the 1850's? Was there something there before?


1849 I think Cardie - graves back to 15th cent., more in your neck of the woods at Harewood Sticks.
Chrism
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Postby Chrism » Thu 23 Sep, 2010 1:40 pm

Kirkstall Abbey was founded in 1152 so some of the monks must be buried around the Abbey somewhere. These must be some of the oldest if found.    
Sit thissen dahn an' tell us abaht it.

electricaldave
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Postby electricaldave » Fri 24 Sep, 2010 3:23 pm

There are some stone age house circles in the woods near Iveson House, bound to be a grave somewhere in the vicinity.

SamMapes
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Postby SamMapes » Fri 17 Jun, 2011 7:30 am

Cardiarms wrote:
I thought it didn't open until the 1850's? Was there something there before?

I presume there was nothing prior to 1850.
dervish99
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Postby dervish99 » Thu 29 Dec, 2011 8:45 pm

there is a tomb stone in St Mary's In The Wood Churchyard in Morley dated 1689, see link below for image.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dervish99/6254614031/in/set-72157627900301810
Near a tree by a river, there's a hole in the ground.

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