Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Bunkers, shelters and other buildings
Leodian
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby Leodian » Fri 08 Jan, 2016 7:46 pm

warringtonrhino wroteColon
Leodian wroteColonIt may not be directly relevant to the thread but I thought this seemed a good thread to ask. I would like to know what is/was the linear feature towards the top left near and just right of the meandering Wykebeck? This map showing it is from a 1908 map in the Old Maps UK website. The feature is not marked on an 1891/93 map in that website but is marked on a 1921 and a 1933/34 map but not on a 1950/51 map.
OMUK1908.jpg


I have had a response from OS.
They do not retain surveyors notes so cannot give a reason for the 'embankment'
OS will not admit that they make mistakes, but this 'may have been one'
He also sent me a copy of 'Instructions to draftsmen and plan examiners' dated 1905 complete with examples of acceptable graphics.
Unfortunately its a pdf file and I don't think it can be posted?


Thanks for your help warringtonrhino, which is appreciated :).
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
The Parksider
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby The Parksider » Sun 10 Jan, 2016 1:51 am

chameleon wroteColon
warringtonrhino wroteColonWe seem to be straying off the Foundry Mill at Seacroft topic.
The mill was on Foundry Mill Street, and the leat that supplied it only ran from Easterly Road to the mill.
Should we create a new topic 'Asket Hill' ?


We determined some time ago that the water for the mill was very unlikely and without some mechanical help, did not come from here. Maps show clearly mill ponds sitting between Foundry Lane ands Moresdale lane, with water running to these from the area of the old pond at Seacroft Hall This stream remained long after the pond was filled in, and was above ground as far down as the land where the ne Fire Station is built. The culvert into which it was then incorporated has been diverted to facilitate said building. In my memory it was also visible above ground in parts before again being contained by Ironwood approach.

A second feed was clearly identified as being from Ross Ghyll, which was interrupted on its journey from the Ring Road to Wyke Beck through what is now Park Land/ Green Space adjacent to Moresdale Lane for this purpose.


Hi Cam,

http://maps.nls.uk/os/6inch-england-and-wales/

OS maps 1842-1852 - brilliant! Have you seen these?

If not check the streams then go down the wyke to Killingbeck, another corn mill down there!
grumpytramp
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby grumpytramp » Mon 11 Jan, 2016 9:08 am

The Parksider wroteColonIf not check the streams then go down the wyke to Killingbeck, another corn mill down there!


Little bit about the White Bridge Mill here http://secretleeds.com/viewtopic.php?t=1635 and its place in history!
warringtonrhino
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby warringtonrhino » Mon 11 Jan, 2016 1:18 pm

I have almost finished my plans and sections of the Foundry Mill buildings showing the boiler, pump, blowing engines and furnace etc.
I read nearly all 725 pages of A Treatise on the Steam Engine Vol 1 by John Farey , and have all the John Smeaton drawings from the Royal Society so the machinery details and building plans are as accurate as possible.
I have resolved the water level / flow issues, but not yet worked out the shape and size of the different buildings.
It was 1989 when I first started research on Mathers Leat and Foundry Mill, I can now see the light at the end of the tunnel :D
I cannot post CAD or 3D files but I could bring them to Leeds on the laptop if anyone would like to see all the Foundry Mill and Mathers Leat details?

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Brunel
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby Brunel » Tue 12 Jan, 2016 2:38 pm

Can you convert your CAD and other files to a picture format, jpg etc.

Or... you could try a "screen grab" Alt+Print Screen, then paste into picture handling program.

You could upload the files to Google or Dropbox etc.
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buffaloskinner
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby buffaloskinner » Tue 12 Jan, 2016 3:15 pm

Or use the SNIP tool in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10, it allows you to take a screenshot
Is this the end of the story ...
or the beginning of a legend?
warringtonrhino
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby warringtonrhino » Tue 12 Jan, 2016 5:36 pm

Brunel wroteColonCan you convert your CAD and other files to a picture format, jpg etc.

Or... you could try a "screen grab" Alt+Print Screen, then paste into picture handling program.

You could upload the files to Google or Dropbox etc.


I have 185 files in my Foundry Mill Directory, most are CAD drawings and 3D details.
As you probably know CAD drawings are drawn at 1:1 then reduced to the required scale for printing.
The largest file I have is a 1990 1:1(yes full size) OS plan of Seacroft Gipton and Crossgates which is 9,471KB; the file cost me nearly £2,000.
I have added lots of historical details including Mather's Leat and Foundry Mill.
The drawing has several 'layers' which can be switched on or off to reveal the extra details which I have added.
I would like to share the information but am reluctant to give it away, and most of it is going into my History of Seacroft book if I ever finish it :D
I can create a jpg of that file but it would be 303.000KB!!!

The 3D files are best seen on screen so that you can rotate and zoom etc. which is more fun :D

I to illustrate the difficulty of posting details, I have attached a small portion of the Mill building section which would benefit an explanation.

I still have a some unresolved details, so I thought a small meet up of 'Foundry Mill fans' would also allow me too pick a few brains.
I have appreciated the support and encouragement given by the group and would like to offer an opportunity to show the overall picture and then zoom into the nuts and bolts details.
Nothing grand- perhaps a pub with a 13amp socket for the laptop, a pint and a discussion.
Attachments
mill all section planes.jpg
mill all section planes.jpg (73.26 KiB) Viewed 1657 times
jim
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby jim » Tue 12 Jan, 2016 9:59 pm

Looks like an early (probably atmospheric - Newcomen?) steam engine driving a waterpump, the outfall of which drives a waterwheel working a further waterpump lifting to a higher point.

warringtonrhino
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby warringtonrhino » Tue 12 Jan, 2016 11:04 pm

jim wroteColonLooks like an early (probably atmospheric - Newcomen?) steam engine driving a waterpump, the outfall of which drives a waterwheel working a further waterpump lifting to a higher point.


Its all John Smeaton machinery, I have used his drawings plans, details and specifications.
It's all drawn to scale, and is about as accurate as I can get with the available sources.
I have switched off some off some of the smaller details on the drawing otherwise it would be illegible.

A rough description is as follows
In 1779 John Smeaton designed a steam engine and overshot wheel for the Seacroft Iron Foundry.
It had a 28 foot diameter waterwheel which required 7200 tons of water per day, 182 cubic feet per minute, and turned 4½ times per minute. The wheel axle had four cranks each connected to one end of a beam engine. The other end of the beams had connecting rods which operated air blowers. These were 54 inch diameter cylinders with 4½ feet stroke, emitting 1286 cubic feet of air per minute, into the furnace stack.
When there was insufficient water in the mill pound, a boiler and ‘fire engine’ lifted the tail water from the bottom of the wheel back up to the mill pound. The boiler was 10 feet diameter with a 5½ inch steam pipe to a 30 inch diameter cylinder with 6 feet stroke. The pump was 21 inch diameter and lifted 182 cubic feet of water per minute.
The boiler and pump were turned off, once the mill pound had been topped up by the natural supplies.
jim
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Re: Foundry Mill at Seacroft

Postby jim » Wed 13 Jan, 2016 10:35 am

Ah, I see - two separate systems. I had taken the proximity of the waterwheel feed to the steam system beam etc to indicate the outfall from its pump. My reference to Newcomen was to query the type of steam engine, not its individual designer/constructor.

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