Meanwood Towers + Strange Structure In Road

Bunkers, shelters and other buildings
simon2710
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Postby simon2710 » Wed 08 Aug, 2007 2:35 pm

Can anybody give me some more info on this gothic looking building that can be found in Towers Way in Meanwood (just off Stonegate Road)???
I know that It had a famous organ and was a church at one point.







Please could you also tell me the purpose of the "Revolutionary Well" not far from Meanwood Towers at the junction of Stonegate Road?



Thank You in advance!
Simon -H-
LS1
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Postby LS1 » Wed 08 Aug, 2007 2:54 pm

Simon, Menawood Towers is the large building, and although never a church did indeed have a large organ that was removed. It was a Schultze organ that later moved to Harrogate. Was built in 1867 for Thos. Kennedy. The chimneys you see in your picture were partly removed sometime inthe 50's I think.

The other structure - the Revolutionary well was built by Oates ( relative of Captain Oates the explorer in commereration of the acsesion (is that how you spell it?) of William of Orange. I remember seeing a picture of it in a slightly different location before the road was widended and it was moved back a bit.
rikj
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Postby rikj » Wed 08 Aug, 2007 6:07 pm

The organ was housed in a wooden organ house big enough to seat 800 people. I think he had it built for his wife, who gave recitals.

It moved to Harrogate in 1877, but came back to Leeds in 1879 to St Bartholomew's church in Armley. Where it still is. The organ has been overhauled and improved several times, the last major re-furb being in 2003. I think it's known as the Armley-Schultze organ.

Meanwood Towers seems originally to have been called Meanwood House. Towers Way follows the line of the old drive to the house, and the gingerbread house style lodge is still there on Meanwood Road.

I used to visit Meanwood Towers years ago to see a friend and it was in a very dilapidated condition. There is a large galleried entrance hall in the middle of it. All very gothic and Gormenghast. From memory there were cellars and sub-cellars below that. Would love to go back and have a look now. The rumour was then that the owners were unknown, and that the money being paid in rent was just being kept by the agents should the owners ever turn up!
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liits
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Postby liits » Thu 09 Aug, 2007 11:21 pm

I seem to remember that this was called the "Judges House" This was while I was at school [Cardinal Heenan] from where the house is visible.

LS1
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Postby LS1 » Thu 09 Aug, 2007 11:28 pm

liits wrote:
I seem to remember that this was called the "Judges House" This was while I was at school [Cardinal Heenan] from where the house is visible.


Hi liits, the Judges Residence was, and still is just a bit further up towards moortown on the opposite side of the road set back from the road. Not sure if the visiting Judges still use it. It seems rather big for this so I wonder if it had or now has another use?
rikj
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Postby rikj » Fri 10 Aug, 2007 12:10 am

Think it's still the Judges' Residence and in use. For how long I don't know as I thinit's under review. Seems it would be cheaper to put up visiting judges in city centre hotels.

Originally it was just Carr Manor. Presumably a manor house.
oldleedsman
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Postby oldleedsman » Fri 10 Aug, 2007 4:55 pm

I grew up nearby and know the well, The Judges Lodgings and Meanwood Towers well (no pun intended).

More details on the Revolution Well, including the inscription, can be found at
http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?resourceIdentifier=2002514_99969119

Meanwood Towers was far more impressive before the tall chimneys (the 'towers') were removed for safety reasons. Not sure when this was, but I remember them in the 60s. It was built in 1867 and designed by Edward Pugin, the son of Augustus. I agree with Riki about the huge entrance hall. I helped someone deliver leaflets there and we were scared stiff - it reminded us of the Munsters home!

We used to sneak in to the grounds of The Judges Residence/Carr Manor at night. It's a very impressive. Built in 1881. I remember the place crawling with police when the Birmingham pub bomb trails took place in Leeds and the judges stayed there.
Lots of pictures on leodis.net

Nearby is a standing stone bearing the inscription 'NEC SE COGNOSct TERRAE VERTs ANNIS. J. Oates P AD 1812'. Anyone know what it means?

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LS1
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Postby LS1 » Fri 10 Aug, 2007 4:59 pm

oldleedsman wrote:
I grew up nearby and know the well, The Judges Lodgings and Meanwood Towers well (no pun intended).

More details on the Revolution Well, including the inscription, can be found at
http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?resourceIdentifier=2002514_99969119

Meanwood Towers was far more impressive before the tall chimneys (the 'towers') were removed for safety reasons. Not sure when this was, but I remember them in the 60s. It was built in 1867 and designed by Edward Pugin, the son of Augustus. I agree with Riki about the huge entrance hall. I helped someone deliver leaflets there and we were scared stiff - it reminded us of the Munsters home!

We used to sneak in to the grounds of The Judges Residence/Carr Manor at night. It's a very impressive. Built in 1881. I remember the place crawling with police when the Birmingham pub bomb trails took place in Leeds and the judges stayed there.
Lots of pictures on leodis.net

Nearby is a standing stone bearing the inscription 'NEC SE COGNOSct TERRAE VERTs ANNIS. J. Oates P AD 1812'. Anyone know what it means?




Not sure what it means, but again was something to do withthe oates that put up the revolution well. He also built King Alfreds Castle that used to stand in the corner of King alfreds Field on Stonegate Road. It's long gone now, but was inthe same corner as where the David Lloyd centre is towards meanwood.

LS1
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Postby LS1 » Fri 10 Aug, 2007 5:05 pm

According to the Leodis website the inscription on the slab means "Neither do the lands know themselves in the turning of the years'.J.Oates A.D. 1812" something to do with the supposed remains of a burial ground that was on this site after the Battle of Stainbeck that allegedly happened during the Civil War. Seems a bit of a charagter this Josiah Oates!
oldleedsman
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Postby oldleedsman » Fri 10 Aug, 2007 5:13 pm

Thanks. King Alfred's Castle was actually built by Jeremiah Dixon in 1720. It was on the rocks at the high-point near the triangulation station. It was demolished in the 50s.

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